California Vehicle Code Section 5200

by on Feb. 08, 2012 in Motor Vehicle · Traffic

Summary: Failing to display license plates provided by the California Department of Motor Vehicles, is deemed to be a violation of California vehicle code section 5200.


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Failing to display license plates provided by the California Department of Motor Vehicles, is deemed to be a violation of California Vehicle Code Section 5200. According to this vehicle code, owners of registered vehicles are automatically issued two license plates. It mandates that license plates should be fastened in the dedicated spaces on the front and back of the automobile.

Exclusions are made for tractors, where plates are only fixated to the front. In some cases, only one plate is issued, and for those who only receive one, the plate should be placed at the back side of the automobile.

A breach of this vehicle code is considered to be a minor offense, also known as an infraction. It normally holds up if traffic offenders do not pay their fines. The fine for California Vehicle Code is one hundred and seventy eight dollars, and VC 5200 was last revisited in the year 2004.

In the event a vehicle owner was issued a ticket for which they were incorrectly charged, a good option would be to consult with a traffic defense lawyer.

Some vehicle codes will incur points if violated. The California points system monitors drivers for the safety of everyone. Once a driver collects a certain number of points within a period of time, the department can take away the driver’s opportunity of owning a valid driver’s license.

In addition, those who break and disobey traffic laws run the risk of higher insurance premiums.

It’s therefore important to contact a lawyer if you’re innocent. Those who are interested, can read more about vehicle codes at the California DMV.

Article posted with keywords: california vehicle codes, vc in CA, CVC5200, VC5200

Lawyer website: www.cmcdefense.com




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