Altamonte Springs Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Florida


Iyada Evette Jackson Lawyer

Iyada Evette Jackson

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law

Iyada Jackson is an accident lawyer proudly serving Altamonte Springs, Florida and the neighboring communities.

Justin G. Hausler Lawyer

Justin G. Hausler

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, DUI-DWI, Motor Vehicle

Lawyer.com Member Questionnaire Please describe a case(s) in the last year or two where you made a big difference. Adoption cases are always ... (more)

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CONTACT

407-617-1064

Paul N Schaefer Lawyer

Paul N Schaefer

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Accident & Injury, Wills & Probate, Real Estate

Born in Daytona Beach, Florida, Attorney Schaefer is a Native Floridian. Mr. Schaefer graduated from Seabreeze High School in Daytona Beach, Florida ... (more)

Dana Kyle Anderson Lawyer

Dana Kyle Anderson

VERIFIED
Real Estate, Business, Divorce & Family Law, Landlord-Tenant, Intellectual Property

Today, I'm able to serve a broad spectrum of clients as I use my expertise to help others develop a healthy relationship within themselves and with ot... (more)

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CONTACT

800-711-5601

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Steve W. Marsee Lawyer

Steve W. Marsee

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law
Marital and Family Law

Based in Orlando, the Law Offices of Steve W. Marsee assists clients throughout Central Florida with sensitive and often complex marital and family la... (more)

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CONTACT

800-985-9160

Gwen  Cryer Lawyer

Gwen Cryer

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Paternity, Child Custody, Alimony & Spousal Support, Prenuptial Agreements

Orlando Attorney Gwen J. Cryer has been representing clients throughout the Central Florida area since 2003. Attorney Cryer is a member of the Florida... (more)

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CONTACT

800-919-6751

Thomas E Rhodes Lawyer

Thomas E Rhodes

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Prenuptial Agreements, Mediation, Child Support, Family Law
Family Law: Divorce, Custody, Support, Alimony, Property Distribution, and Prenuptial Agreements

Thomas Rhodes is an Orlando family law attorney serving clients throughout central Florida in child custody and support, domestic violence and divorce... (more)

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CONTACT

800-811-9250

Debra G. Simms

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Dispute Resolution, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Sarrah J. Epifanio

Family Law, Wills, Traffic, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Ben Zaeri

Family Law, Banking & Finance, Wills & Probate, Construction
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Altamonte Springs Divorce & Family Law Lawyers and Altamonte Springs Divorce & Family Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Divorce & Family Law practice areas such as Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce and Family Law matters.

LEGAL TERMS

FOSTER CARE

Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents h... (more...)
Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents have a legal responsibility to care for their foster children, but do not have all the rights of a biological parent--for example, they may have limited rights to discipline the children, to raise them according to a certain religion or to authorize non-emergency medical procedures for them. The foster parents do not become the child's legal parents unless the biological parents' rights are terminated by a court and the foster parents adopt the child. This is not typically encouraged, as the goal of foster care is to provide temporary support for the children until they can be returned to their parents. See also foster child.

HEARING

In the trial court context, a legal proceeding (other than a full-scale trial) held before a judge. During a hearing, evidence and arguments are presented in an... (more...)
In the trial court context, a legal proceeding (other than a full-scale trial) held before a judge. During a hearing, evidence and arguments are presented in an effort to resolve a disputed factual or legal issue. Hearings typically, but by no means always, occur prior to trial when a party asks the judge to decide a specific issue--often on an interim basis--such as whether a temporary restraining order or preliminary injunction should be issued, or temporary child custody or child support awarded. In the administrative or agency law context, a hearing is usually a proceeding before an administrative hearing officer or judge representing an agency that has the power to regulate a particular field or oversee a governmental benefit program. For example, the Federal Aviation Board (FAB) has the authority to hold hearings on airline safety, and a state Worker's Compensation Appeals Board has the power to rule on the appeals of people whose applications for benefits have been denied.

SPOUSAL SUPPORT

See alimony.

AMICUS CURIAE

Latin for 'friend of the court.' This term describes a person or organization that is not a party to a lawsuit as plaintiff or defendant but that has a strong i... (more...)
Latin for 'friend of the court.' This term describes a person or organization that is not a party to a lawsuit as plaintiff or defendant but that has a strong interest in the case and wants to get its two cents in. For example, the ACLU often submits materials to support a person who claims a violation of civil rights even though that person is represented by a lawyer.

BEST INTERESTS (OF THE CHILD)

The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best inter... (more...)
The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best interests of the child. Similarly, when asked to decide on custody issues in a divorce case, the judge will base his or her decision on the child's best interests. And the same test is used when judges decide whether a child should be removed from a parent's home because of neglect or abuse. Factors considered by the court in deciding the best interests of a child include: age and sex of the child mental and physical health of the child mental and physical health of the parents lifestyle and other social factors of the parents emotional ties between the parents and the child ability of the parents to provide the child with food, shelter, clothing and medical care established living pattern for the child concerning school, home, community and religious institution quality of schooling, and the child's preference.

FAULT DIVORCE

A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorc... (more...)
A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorce from the 'guilty' spouse. Today, 35 states still allow a spouse to allege fault in obtaining a divorce. The traditional fault grounds for divorce are adultery, cruelty, desertion, confinement in prison, physical incapacity and incurable insanity. These grounds are also generally referred to as marital misconduct.

MEDIAN FAMILY INCOME

An annual income figure for which there are as many families with incomes below that level as there are above that level. The Census Bureau publishes median fam... (more...)
An annual income figure for which there are as many families with incomes below that level as there are above that level. The Census Bureau publishes median family income figures for each state and for different family sizes. A debtor whose current monthly income is higher than the median family income in his or her state must pass the means test in order to file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, and must commit all disposable income to a five-year repayment plan if filing for Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

PHYSICAL INCAPACITY

The inability of a spouse to engage in sexual intercourse with the other spouse. In some states, physical incapacity is a ground for an annulment or fault divor... (more...)
The inability of a spouse to engage in sexual intercourse with the other spouse. In some states, physical incapacity is a ground for an annulment or fault divorce, assuming the incapacity was not disclosed to the other spouse before the marriage.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.