Amarillo Family Law Lawyer, Texas


Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Mike Watkins

Criminal, Family Law, Mediation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Stewart R. Werner

Family Law, Medical Malpractice, Banking & Finance, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

John Michael Watkins

Family Law, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Juvenile Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Joshua Russell Woodburn

Family Law, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  17 Years
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James B. Johnston

State Appellate Practice, Family Law, Criminal, Business & Trade
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  36 Years

Stacy Zavala

Motor Vehicle, Wills & Probate, Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years

Vaavia Rudd . Edwards

Family Law, Divorce, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Christopher K. Wrampelmeier

Traffic, Wills & Probate, Family Law, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Ryan Lee Turman

Juvenile Law, Family Law, Criminal, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kay Lee Pechin

Social Security, Family Law, Administrative Law, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  26 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

GIFT TAXES

Federal taxes assessed on any gift, or combination of gifts, from one person to another that exceeds $12,000 in one year. Several kinds of gifts are exempt form... (more...)
Federal taxes assessed on any gift, or combination of gifts, from one person to another that exceeds $12,000 in one year. Several kinds of gifts are exempt form this tax: gifts to tax-exempt charities, gifts to your spouse (limited to $120,000 annually if the recipient isn't a U.S. citizen) and gifts made for tuition or medical bills. In addition to the annual gift tax exclusion, there is a $1 million cumulative tax exemption for gifts. In other words, you can give away a total of $1 million during your lifetime -- over and above the gifts you give using the annual exclusion -- without paying gift taxes.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.

CUSTODIAN

A term used by the Uniform Transfers to Minors Act for the person named to manage property left to a child under the terms of that Act. The custodian will manag... (more...)
A term used by the Uniform Transfers to Minors Act for the person named to manage property left to a child under the terms of that Act. The custodian will manage the property if the gift giver dies before the child has reached the age specified by state law -- usually 21. When the child reaches the specified age, he will receive the property and the custodian will have no further role in its management.

ATTORNEY FEES

The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (... (more...)
The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (the lawyer collects a percentage of any money she wins for her client and nothing if there is no recovery), or retainer (usually a down payment as part of an hourly or per job fee agreement). Attorney fees must usually be paid by the client who hires a lawyer, though occasionally a law or contract will require the losing party of a lawsuit to pay the winner's court costs and attorney fees. For example, a contract might contain a provision that says the loser of any lawsuit between the parties to the contract will pay the winner's attorney fees. Many laws designed to protect consumers also provide for attorney fees -- for example, most state laws that require landlords to provide habitable housing also specify that a tenant who sues and wins using that law may collect attorney fees. And in family law cases -- divorce, custody and child support -- judges often have the power to order the more affluent spouse to pay the other spouse's attorney fees, even where there is no clear victor.

ADOPTED CHILD

Any person, whether an adult or a minor, who is legally adopted as the child of another in a court proceeding. See adoption.

SOLE CUSTODY

An arrangement whereby only one parent has physical and legal custody of a child and the other parent has visitation rights.

QMSCO

See Qualified Medical Child Support Order.

PHYSICAL CUSTODY

The right and obligation of a parent to have his child live with him. Compare legal custody.

COLLUSION

Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds f... (more...)
Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds for divorce (such as adultery). By fabricating a permitted reason for divorce, colluding couples hoped to trick a judge into granting their freedom from the marriage. But a spouse accused of wrongdoing who later changed his or her mind about the divorce could expose the collusion to prevent the divorce from going through.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

In re ABP

... STANDARD OF REVIEW. Most appealable issues in a family law case, including the issues in this case, are evaluated under an abuse-of-discretion standard. ... I have practiced in the community, in this community for approximately 15 years in the area of family law. ...

IN RE DEPT. OF FAMILY & PROTECTIVE SERVICES

... We review a trial court's interpretation of the law de novo. State v. Shumake, 199 SW3d 279, 284 (Tex.2006). A trial court has no discretion in determining what the law is or properly applying the law. In re Tex. Dep't of Family & Protective Servs., 210 SW3d 609, 612 (Tex.2006). ...

Lumpkin v. DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY PROT. SERV.

... 263.405(i); see Pool v. Texas Dep't of Family & Protective ... that, if a trial court determines that an appeal is frivolous, the court has necessarily determined that each of the issues identified in the statement of points is frivolous; that is, that they lack a substantial basis in law or fact ...