Aurora Child Custody Lawyer, Colorado

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Includes: Guardianships & Conservatorships, Custody & Visitation

Michael Patrick Hinds Lawyer

Michael Patrick Hinds

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Family Law, Child Support, Child Custody

A Colorado native, Mike Hinds attended Eckerd College in Saint Petersburg, Florida, majoring in International Business and Modern Languages. Before at... (more)

Angela R. Whitford Lawyer

Angela R. Whitford

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Child Custody, Child Support

Ms. Whitford's practice focuses on representing clients in all aspects of the dissolution of marriage process, legal separation, post-decree modificat... (more)

Leonard R. Higdon Lawyer

Leonard R. Higdon

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Lawsuit & Dispute, Criminal
We Will Help You Evaluate Options We Will Protect Your Interests

Leonard Higdon has lived in Colorado since 1985. Raised in Hawaii, he moved to Colorado to attend Fort Lewis College in Durango, where he received his... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-752-1381

John Loren Eckelberry Lawyer

John Loren Eckelberry

VERIFIED
Family Law, Bankruptcy, Divorce, Child Custody, Collection
Providing personal and financial fresh starts for almost 20 years!

John has been practicing law in Colorado since 1998. He is the founding member of Eckelberry Law Firm, established in 2006, in charge of the family l... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

303-434-1131

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Adam William Galvan Moore Lawyer

Adam William Galvan Moore

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Family Law, Child Custody, Child Support

Welcome to the law firm of Adam W.G. Moore. I am a solo practitioner providing strong, solid legal representation in all Colorado divorce and family l... (more)

Curtis R. Spencer

Employment, Child Custody, Consumer Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  33 Years

Camilla Dellinger

Child Custody, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  26 Years

Rowe P Stayton

Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  37 Years

Ida E. Escobedo-Betson

Divorce, Family Law, Juvenile Law, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  31 Years

Ida E Escobedo-Betson

Divorce, Family Law, Child Custody, Juvenile Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  31 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

STEPCHILD

A child born to your spouse before your marriage whom you have not legally adopted. If you adopt the child, he or she is legally treated just like a biological ... (more...)
A child born to your spouse before your marriage whom you have not legally adopted. If you adopt the child, he or she is legally treated just like a biological offspring. Under the Uniform Probate Code, followed in some states, a stepchild belongs in the same class as a biological child and will inherit property left 'to my children.' In other states, a stepchild is not treated like a biological child unless he or she can prove that the parental relationship was established when he or she was a minor and that adoption would have occurred but for some legal obstacle.

ATTORNEY FEES

The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (... (more...)
The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (the lawyer collects a percentage of any money she wins for her client and nothing if there is no recovery), or retainer (usually a down payment as part of an hourly or per job fee agreement). Attorney fees must usually be paid by the client who hires a lawyer, though occasionally a law or contract will require the losing party of a lawsuit to pay the winner's court costs and attorney fees. For example, a contract might contain a provision that says the loser of any lawsuit between the parties to the contract will pay the winner's attorney fees. Many laws designed to protect consumers also provide for attorney fees -- for example, most state laws that require landlords to provide habitable housing also specify that a tenant who sues and wins using that law may collect attorney fees. And in family law cases -- divorce, custody and child support -- judges often have the power to order the more affluent spouse to pay the other spouse's attorney fees, even where there is no clear victor.

TENANCY BY THE ENTIRETY

A special kind of property ownership that's only for married couples. Both spouses have the right to enjoy the entire property, and when one spouse dies, the su... (more...)
A special kind of property ownership that's only for married couples. Both spouses have the right to enjoy the entire property, and when one spouse dies, the surviving spouse gets title to the property (called a right of survivorship). It is similar to joint tenancy, but it is available in only about half the states.

FOSTER CHILD

A child placed by a government agency or a court in the care of someone other than his or her natural parents. Foster children may be removed from their family ... (more...)
A child placed by a government agency or a court in the care of someone other than his or her natural parents. Foster children may be removed from their family home because of parental abuse or neglect. Occasionally, parents voluntarily place their children in foster care. See foster care.

NEXT FRIEND

A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children a... (more...)
A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children are often represented in court by their parents as 'next friends.'

ALIMONY

The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of lo... (more...)
The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of long duration (ten years or more) or in the case of an ailing spouse, alimony usually lasts for a set period, with the expectation that the recipient spouse will become self-supporting. Alimony is also called 'spousal support' or 'maintenance.'

STIRPES

A term used in wills that refers to descendants of a common ancestor or branch of a family.

CRUELTY

Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practi... (more...)
Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practical matter, courts will accept minor wrongs or disagreements as sufficient evidence of cruelty to justify the divorce.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

In re LS

... The only explanation for the dismissal was that "the State of Nebraska has jurisdiction over the matter." The minute order made no reference to child custody. ... We conclude the Adams County District Court never declined child custody jurisdiction on inconvenient forum grounds. ...

PEOPLE EX REL. DP

... The UCCJEA addresses whether a Colorado court or a non-Colorado court has jurisdiction in child custody proceedings. See §§ 14-13-101 to -403. ... 423, 425, 535 P.2d 1122, 1123 (1975)(trial judges sitting in trial courts have discretion to make child custody determinations). ...

In re MJK

... Id. Modification statutes, on the other hand, do not do so, because "[i]n the modification context, the State has a compelling interest to protect the child's need for stability and to prevent constant litigation in child custody cases." Id. ...