Beaverton Family Law Lawyer, Oregon

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Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Barbara J. Aaby

Estate, Family Law, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Shelley L. Fuller

Juvenile Law, Family Law, Adoption, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Paul J. DeBast

Family Law, Collaborative Law, Divorce, Farms
Status:  In Good Standing           

Barbara P. McFarland

Family Law, Collaborative Law, Divorce, Farms
Status:  In Good Standing           
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James B Richardson

Family Law, Wills & Probate, Wills, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

Phillip Hingson

Family Law, Wills & Probate, Wills, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kathy Proctor

Wills, Wills & Probate, Workers' Compensation, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Stephen J. Bedor

Wills & Probate, Family Law, Civil Rights, Banking & Finance
Status:  In Good Standing           

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M. Scott Leibenguth

Farms, Divorce, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Fred C. Nachtigal

Family Law, Wills & Probate, Corporate, Wills
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

FMLA

See Family and Medical Leave Act.

DIVORCE AGREEMENT

An agreement made by a divorcing couple regarding the division of property, custody and visitation of the children, alimony or child support. The agreement must... (more...)
An agreement made by a divorcing couple regarding the division of property, custody and visitation of the children, alimony or child support. The agreement must be put in writing, signed by the parties and accepted by the court. It becomes part of the divorce decree and does away with the necessity of having a trial on the issues covered by the agreement. A divorce agreement may also be called a marital settlement agreement, marital termination agreement or settlement agreement.

MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE

A document that provides proof of a marriage, typically issued to the newlyweds a few weeks after they file for the certificate in a county office. Most states ... (more...)
A document that provides proof of a marriage, typically issued to the newlyweds a few weeks after they file for the certificate in a county office. Most states require both spouses, the person who officiated the marriage and one or two witnesses to sign the marriage certificate; often this is done just after the ceremony.

ALIMONY

The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of lo... (more...)
The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of long duration (ten years or more) or in the case of an ailing spouse, alimony usually lasts for a set period, with the expectation that the recipient spouse will become self-supporting. Alimony is also called 'spousal support' or 'maintenance.'

BRIEF

A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she shoul... (more...)
A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she should prevail. These arguments must be supported by legal authority and precedent, such as statutes, regulations and previous court decisions. Although it is usually possible to submit a brief to a trial court (called a trial brief), briefs are most commonly used as a central part of the appeal process (an appellate brief). But don't be fooled by the name -- briefs are usually anything but brief, as pointed out by writer Franz Kafka, who defined a lawyer as 'a person who writes a 10,000 word decision and calls it a brief.'

ABANDONMENT (OF A CHILD)

A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the ch... (more...)
A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the child abandoned by that parent and order that person's parental rights terminated. Abandonment also describes situations in which a child is physically abandoned -- for example, left on a doorstep, delivered to a hospital or put in a trash can. Physically abandoned children are usually placed in orphanages and made available for adoption.

GIFT TAXES

Federal taxes assessed on any gift, or combination of gifts, from one person to another that exceeds $12,000 in one year. Several kinds of gifts are exempt form... (more...)
Federal taxes assessed on any gift, or combination of gifts, from one person to another that exceeds $12,000 in one year. Several kinds of gifts are exempt form this tax: gifts to tax-exempt charities, gifts to your spouse (limited to $120,000 annually if the recipient isn't a U.S. citizen) and gifts made for tuition or medical bills. In addition to the annual gift tax exclusion, there is a $1 million cumulative tax exemption for gifts. In other words, you can give away a total of $1 million during your lifetime -- over and above the gifts you give using the annual exclusion -- without paying gift taxes.

INCURABLE INSANITY

A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of... (more...)
A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of the spouse being divorced and that the insanity is incurable.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Friends of Yamhill County v. BD. OF COMR'S

... waiver restricts the allowed use "to the extent that use was permitted when [claimant] acquired the property on December 3, 1970." Friends contends that the administrative record establishes that, at the time of acquisition, county zoning law precluded single-family dwellings on ...

Vogelin v. American Family Mutual Ins. Co.

... Jessica VOGELIN, Plaintiff-Appellant, v. AMERICAN FAMILY MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY, Defendant-Respondent. ... B) The amount paid and the present value of all amounts payable on account of such bodily injury under any workers' compensation law, disability benefits ...

Vogelin v. American Family Mut. Ins. Co.

... Thus, plaintiff asserted, although the policy that she had purchased from defendant purportedly provided that the tortfeasor's $25,000 liability payment would be deducted from her UM liability limit ($100,000), Oregon law required that that ... Vogelin v. American Family Mutual Ins. ...