Blairstown Trusts Lawyer, Iowa


Jase Henry Jensen

Real Estate, Trusts, Family Law, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  8 Years

Allan L. Harms

International Intellectual Property, Trusts, Business & Trade
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  46 Years

James Allen Schwiebert

Real Estate, Tax, Trusts, Electronic Commerce
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  42 Years

Robert J. O'Shea

Tax, Real Estate, Business & Trade, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           
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H. Edward Beatty

Real Estate, Estate Administration, Trusts, Wills
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  59 Years

Byron G. Riley

Tax, Wills, Trusts, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  63 Years

Forrest W. Rosser

Real Estate, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  66 Years

Philip M. Reisetter

Real Estate, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  50 Years

James D. Mccarragher

Litigation, Trusts, Family Law, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Philip A. Leff

Corporate, Estate Planning, Real Estate, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

TRUSTEE POWERS

The provisions in a trust document defining what the trustee may and may not do.

CURATOR

See conservator.

QDOT TRUST

A trust used to postpone estate tax when more than the amount of the personal federal estate tax exemption is left to a non-U.S. citizen spouse by the other spo... (more...)
A trust used to postpone estate tax when more than the amount of the personal federal estate tax exemption is left to a non-U.S. citizen spouse by the other spouse. QDOT stands for qualified domestic trust.

SPENDTHRIFT TRUST

A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the benefi... (more...)
A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the beneficiary as needed, and sometimes paying third parties (creditors, for example) on the beneficiary's behalf, bypassing the beneficiary completely. Spendthrift trusts typically contain a provision prohibiting creditors from seizing the trust fund to satisfy the beneficiary's debts. These trusts are legal in most states, even though creditors hate them.

STATUTORY SHARE

The portion of a deceased person's estate that a spouse is entitled to claim under state law. The statutory share is usually one-third or one-half of the deceas... (more...)
The portion of a deceased person's estate that a spouse is entitled to claim under state law. The statutory share is usually one-third or one-half of the deceased spouse's property, but in some states the exact amount of the spouse's share depends on whether or not the couple has young children and, in a few states, on how long the couple was married. In most states, if the deceased spouse left a will, the surviving spouse must choose either what the will provides or the statutory share. Sometimes the statutory share is known by its more arcane legal name, dower and curtesy, or as a forced or elective share.

ALTERNATE BENEFICIARY

A person, organization or institution that receives property through a will, trust or insurance policy when the first named beneficiary is unable or refuses to ... (more...)
A person, organization or institution that receives property through a will, trust or insurance policy when the first named beneficiary is unable or refuses to take the property. For example, in his will Jake leaves his collection of sheet music to his daughter, Mia, and names the local symphony as alternate beneficiary. When Jake dies, Mia decides that the symphony can make better use of the sheet music than she can, so she refuses (disclaims) the gift, and the manuscripts pass directly to the symphony. In insurance law, the alternate beneficiary, usually the person who receives the insurance proceeds because the initial or primary beneficiary has died, is called the secondary or contingent beneficiary.

RULE AGAINST PERPETUITIES

An exceedingly complex legal doctrine that limits the amount of time that property can be controlled after death by a person's instructions in a will. For examp... (more...)
An exceedingly complex legal doctrine that limits the amount of time that property can be controlled after death by a person's instructions in a will. For example, a person would not be allowed to leave property to her husband for his life, then to her children for their lives, then to her grandchildren. The gift would potentially go to the grandchildren at a point too remote in time.

RESIDUARY ESTATE

The property that remains in a deceased person's estate after all specific gifts are made, and all debts, taxes, administrative fees, probate costs, and court c... (more...)
The property that remains in a deceased person's estate after all specific gifts are made, and all debts, taxes, administrative fees, probate costs, and court costs are paid. The residuary estate also includes any gifts under a will that fail or lapse. For example, Connie's will leaves her house and all its furnishings to Andrew, her VW bug to her friend Carl, and the remainder of her property (the residuary estate) to her sister Sara. She doesn't name any alternate beneficiaries. Carl dies before Connie. The VW bug becomes part of the residuary estate and passes to Sara, along with all of Connie's property other than the house and furnishings. Also called the residual estate or residue.

RESIDUARY BENEFICIARY

A person who receives any property by a will or trust that is not specifically left to another designated beneficiary. For example, if Antonio makes a will leav... (more...)
A person who receives any property by a will or trust that is not specifically left to another designated beneficiary. For example, if Antonio makes a will leaving his home to Edwina and the remainder of his property to Elmo, then Elmo is the residuary beneficiary.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

In re Estate of Gist

... death, to the extent of such interests, including but not limited to interests in jointly held property, retained life estates, and interests in trusts." Id. ... In Barkema, we identified the two classifications of support trusts, a pure support trust and a discretionary support trust. Id. at 53-54. ...

IN THE MATTER OF ESTATE OF McDOWELL

... Jur. 2d Wills § 196, at 403 (2002). Such a provision is authorized under Iowa and Oregon statutes, [2] both adapted from the Uniform Testamentary Additions to Trusts Act (1960) ("UTATA"). ... 1 Austin W. Scott et al., Scott and Ascher on Trusts § 7.1.3, at 352 (Aspen 5th ed. 2006). ...

IN RE MATTER OF TRUST UNDER THE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF WEITZEL

... Bass, 196 NW2d at 435; see also In re Woltersdorf, 255 Iowa 914, 916, 124 NW2d 510, 511 (1963) ("The matter of fees for executors and trustees rests within the sound discretion of the trial court."); Restatement (Third) of Trusts § 38 cmt. ...