Brinson DUI-DWI Lawyer, Georgia

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Eric Landon Gay

Divorce, Divorce & Family Law, DUI-DWI, Criminal
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Robert Robinson Mclendon

Education, Traffic, DUI-DWI, Criminal
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Craig Edward Miller

Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  23 Years

Peter Emmons

Wills & Probate, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Bankruptcy
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Robert Christopher Richardson

Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  7 Years

Bruce Wheat Kirbo

Traffic, Estate, Adoption, Misdemeanor
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  38 Years

Edwin J. Perry

Wills & Probate, Criminal, Real Estate, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  46 Years

Patrick Ervin Chisholm

Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

Hoyle Mclendon

Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

Fletcher Marten Mulnix

Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  4 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

LARCENY

Another term for theft. Although the definition of this term differs from state to state, it typically means taking property belonging to another with the inten... (more...)
Another term for theft. Although the definition of this term differs from state to state, it typically means taking property belonging to another with the intent to permanently deprive the owner of the property. If the taking is non forceful, it is larceny; if it is accompanied by force or fear directed against a person, it is robbery, a much more serious offense.

ACCOMPLICE

Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An ... (more...)
Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An accomplice is guilty of the same offense and usually receives the same sentence as the principal. For instance, the driver of the getaway car for a burglary is an accomplice and will be guilty of the burglary even though he may not have entered the building.

ARREST WARRANT

A document issued by a judge or magistrate that authorizes the police to arrest someone. Warrants are issued when law enforcement personnel present evidence to ... (more...)
A document issued by a judge or magistrate that authorizes the police to arrest someone. Warrants are issued when law enforcement personnel present evidence to the judge or magistrate that convinces her that it is reasonably likely that a crime has taken place and that the person to be named in the warrant is criminally responsible for that crime.

EXCLUSIONARY RULE

A rule of evidence that disallows the use of illegally obtained evidence in criminal trials. For example, the exclusionary rule would prevent a prosecutor from ... (more...)
A rule of evidence that disallows the use of illegally obtained evidence in criminal trials. For example, the exclusionary rule would prevent a prosecutor from introducing at trial evidence seized during an illegal search.

LINEUP

A procedure in which the police place a suspect in a line with a group of other people and ask an eyewitness to the crime to identify the person he saw at the c... (more...)
A procedure in which the police place a suspect in a line with a group of other people and ask an eyewitness to the crime to identify the person he saw at the crime scene. The police are supposed to choose similar-looking people to appear with the suspect. If the suspect alone matches the physical description of the perpetrator, evidence of the identification can be attacked at trial. For example, if the robber is described as a Latino male, and the suspect, a Latino male, is placed in a lineup with ten white males, a witness' identification of him as the robber will be challenged by the defense attorney.

SPECIFIC INTENT

An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of ... (more...)
An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of larceny is the taking of the personal property of another with the intent to permanently deprive the other person of the property. A person is not guilty of larceny just because he took someone else's property; it must be proven that he took it with the purpose of keeping it permanently.

PUBLIC DEFENDER

A lawyer appointed by the court and paid by the county, state, or federal government to represent clients who are charged with violations of criminal law and ar... (more...)
A lawyer appointed by the court and paid by the county, state, or federal government to represent clients who are charged with violations of criminal law and are unable to pay for their own defense.

MCNAGHTEN RULE

The earliest and most common test for criminal insanity, in which a criminal defendant is judged legally insane only if he could not distinguish right from wron... (more...)
The earliest and most common test for criminal insanity, in which a criminal defendant is judged legally insane only if he could not distinguish right from wrong at the time he committed the crime. For example, a delusional psychotic who believed that his assaultive acts were in response to the will of God would not be criminally responsible for his acts.

FEDERAL COURT

A branch of the United States government with power derived directly from the U.S. Constitution. Federal courts decide cases involving the U.S. Constitution, fe... (more...)
A branch of the United States government with power derived directly from the U.S. Constitution. Federal courts decide cases involving the U.S. Constitution, federal law--for example, patents, federal taxes, labor law and federal crimes, such as robbing a federally chartered bank--and cases where the parties are from different states and are involved in a dispute for $75,000 or more.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

State v. Underwood

... Did the Court of Appeals err in affirming the grant of a defendant's motion to suppress the results of a State-administered breath test where an officer who had probable cause to arrest a defendant for DUI read the implied consent rights of OCGA § 40-5-55[ [2] ] to the defendant ...

State v. Rish

... In granting that motion, the trial court found that the State lacked probable cause to arrest Rish for DUI-less safe (OCGA § 40-6-391(a)(1)). While we affirm the trial court's ruling on this issue, we also find that, as a matter of law, the State did have probable cause to arrest Rish for ...

Wade v. State

... Following a bench trial, factually stipulated for trial purposes (to preclude the State's witnesses from having to appear), while preserving the due process issues for appellate review, Brittany Wade appeals her conviction of DUI less-safe, [1] contending that her bent of mind or ...