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Elliot D. Margolis Lawyer

Elliot D. Margolis

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Divorce & Family Law, Criminal

Mr. Margolis has been rated “highly qualified” by judges and other attorneys, according to legal rating service Martindale-Hubbell. He is a member... (more)

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Jack L. Jaffe

Criminal, Divorce, Internet, Licensing
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Steven S Vernier

Bankruptcy, Criminal, Estate Planning, Family Law, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Aaron D. Geyer

Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Business, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  33 Years
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Christopher P Aiello

Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  27 Years

Giuseppe A. Biondo

Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Business, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

Walter Bieber

Federal Appellate Practice, Trusts, Divorce, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Walter J. Czechowski

Federal Appellate Practice, Trusts, Family Law, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

David C. Roby

Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Lawsuit & Dispute, Traffic
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

Salvatore D. Palombo

Family Law, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  37 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

TENANCY BY THE ENTIRETY

A special kind of property ownership that's only for married couples. Both spouses have the right to enjoy the entire property, and when one spouse dies, the su... (more...)
A special kind of property ownership that's only for married couples. Both spouses have the right to enjoy the entire property, and when one spouse dies, the surviving spouse gets title to the property (called a right of survivorship). It is similar to joint tenancy, but it is available in only about half the states.

ADOPTION

A court procedure by which an adult becomes the legal parent of someone who is not his or her biological child. Adoption creates a parent-child relationship rec... (more...)
A court procedure by which an adult becomes the legal parent of someone who is not his or her biological child. Adoption creates a parent-child relationship recognized for all legal purposes -- including child support obligations, inheritance rights and custody.

CENSUS

An official count of the number of people living in a certain area, such as a district, city, county, state, or nation. The United States Constitution requires ... (more...)
An official count of the number of people living in a certain area, such as a district, city, county, state, or nation. The United States Constitution requires the federal government to perform a national census every ten years. The census includes information about the respondents' sex, age, family, and social and economic status.

SICK LEAVE

Time off work for illness. Most employers provide for some paid sick leave, although no law requires them to do so. Under the Family and Medical Leave Act, howe... (more...)
Time off work for illness. Most employers provide for some paid sick leave, although no law requires them to do so. Under the Family and Medical Leave Act, however, a worker is guaranteed up to 12 weeks per year of unpaid leave for severe or lasting illnesses.

PHYSICAL CUSTODY

The right and obligation of a parent to have his child live with him. Compare legal custody.

CASE

A term that most often refers to a lawsuit -- for example, 'I filed my small claims case.' 'Case' also refers to a written decision by a judge -- or for an appe... (more...)
A term that most often refers to a lawsuit -- for example, 'I filed my small claims case.' 'Case' also refers to a written decision by a judge -- or for an appellate case, a panel of judges. For example, the U.S. Supreme Court's decision legalizing abortion is commonly referred to as the Roe v. Wade case. Finally, the term also describes the evidence a party submits in support of her position -- for example, 'I have made my case' or ''My case-in-chief' has been completed.'

MARTIAL MISCONDUCT

See fault divorce.

COMPARABLE RECTITUDE

A doctrine that grants the spouse least at fault a divorce when both spouses have shown grounds for divorce. It is a response to an old common-law rule that pre... (more...)
A doctrine that grants the spouse least at fault a divorce when both spouses have shown grounds for divorce. It is a response to an old common-law rule that prevented a divorce when both spouses were at fault.

FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT (FMLA)

A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family hea... (more...)
A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family health needs or personal illness. The employer must allow the employee to return to the same position or a position similar to that held before taking the leave. There are exceptions to the FMLA: the most notable is that only employers with 50 or more employees are covered--about half the workforce.