Charleston Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Mississippi


John C. Cox Lawyer

John C. Cox

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Criminal, Real Estate
The Oldest Law Firm in Cleveland, Mississippi

A native of Cleveland , John C. Cox has been practicing law in his hometown since 1999. John began work as an associate for his late father and cous... (more)

Walter Alan Davis Lawyer

Walter Alan Davis

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Divorce, Accident & Injury, Wills & Probate

The law office of Dunbar Davis provides professional, competent and honest representation for their clients. John Dunbar and Walt Davis consistently s... (more)

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800-681-7510

A.E. (Rusty) Harlow

Social Security -- Disability, Family Law, Pharmaceutical Product, Medical Malpractice, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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M. Collins Bailey

Products Liability, Family Law, Medical Malpractice, Workers' Compensation
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Ancil L. Cox

Agribusiness, Agriculture, Adoption, Administrative Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Sabrina D. Howell

Social Security -- Disability, Family Law, Pharmaceutical Product, Medical Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  17 Years

Sabrina Davidson Howell

Social Security -- Disability, Family Law, Pharmaceutical Product, Medical Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  17 Years

Clyde V Hill

Dispute Resolution, Wrongful Termination, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  38 Years

James Andrew Yelton

Aviation, Family Law, Contract, Products Liability
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

Will Ellis Pittman

Divorce, DUI-DWI, Civil Rights, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

AGE OF MAJORITY

Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in ... (more...)
Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in the armed forces and purchase alcohol. Also, parents may stop making child support payments when a child reaches the age of majority. In most states the age of majority is 18, but this varies depending on the activity. For example, in some states people are allowed to vote when they reach the age of eighteen, but can't purchase alcohol until they're 21.

LEGAL CUSTODY

The right and obligation to make decisions about a child's upbringing, including schooling and medical care. Many states typically have both parents share legal... (more...)
The right and obligation to make decisions about a child's upbringing, including schooling and medical care. Many states typically have both parents share legal custody of a child. Compare physical custody.

CONFINEMENT IN PRISON

In most states with fault divorce, grounds for a spouse not in prison to obtain a fault divorce if the other spouse has been imprisoned for a certain number of ... (more...)
In most states with fault divorce, grounds for a spouse not in prison to obtain a fault divorce if the other spouse has been imprisoned for a certain number of years.

IRREMEDIABLE OR IRRETRIEVABLE BREAKDOWN

The situation that occurs in a marriage when one spouse refuses to live with the other and will not work toward reconciliation. In a number of states, irremedia... (more...)
The situation that occurs in a marriage when one spouse refuses to live with the other and will not work toward reconciliation. In a number of states, irremediable breakdown is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into whether the marriage has actually broken down, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the marriage has fallen apart. Compare incompatibility; irreconcilable differences.

STIRPES

A term used in wills that refers to descendants of a common ancestor or branch of a family.

SOLE CUSTODY

An arrangement whereby only one parent has physical and legal custody of a child and the other parent has visitation rights.

SICK LEAVE

Time off work for illness. Most employers provide for some paid sick leave, although no law requires them to do so. Under the Family and Medical Leave Act, howe... (more...)
Time off work for illness. Most employers provide for some paid sick leave, although no law requires them to do so. Under the Family and Medical Leave Act, however, a worker is guaranteed up to 12 weeks per year of unpaid leave for severe or lasting illnesses.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.

SHARED CUSTODY

See joint custody.