Charlotte Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, North Carolina

Sponsored Law Firm


Kara K. Goodman Lawyer

Kara K. Goodman

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Custody & Visitation, Alimony & Spousal Support

Kara Goodman is a dedicated, experienced, and compassionate lawyer who practices in the area of family law. As a child of parents that divorced before... (more)

Carlos R. Emory Lawyer

Carlos R. Emory

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Consumer Rights, Workers' Compensation

C. Randy Emory was born and raised in the small, rural town of Wilson NC. Throughout his childhood, Mr. Emory displayed many leadership qualities. In ... (more)

Malcolm B. McSpadden Lawyer

Malcolm B. McSpadden

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Workers' Compensation, Traffic

Malcolm McSpadden is a practicing attorney in the state of North Carolina. He graduated from Wake Forest University with his J.D. He currently works a... (more)

Kirk Robert Lundell Lawyer

Kirk Robert Lundell

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Employment, Criminal, DUI-DWI

Following a successful 15-year career managing several well-known retail stores throughout the country, Mr. Lundell decided to refocus his passion for... (more)

Speak with Lawyer.com
Vicki  Wilson Lawyer

Vicki Wilson

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Wills, Adoption, Entertainment
An attorney Who Cares About You and Your Future!

Attorney Vicki Webb is an experienced attorney who Cares About her Clients. She is ready to talk with you and guide you through the stressful legal pr... (more)

Cyndi M. Chaney

Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Farms, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

Laura C. Manfreda

Litigation, Estate Administration, Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

W. Chad Winebarger

Family Law, Workers' Compensation, Employment, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Payton D. Hoover

Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           

Peter E. McArdle

Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Criminal, Defamation & Slander
Status:  In Good Standing           

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-620-0900

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.


Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

TIPS

Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Charlotte Divorce & Family Law Lawyers and Charlotte Divorce & Family Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Divorce & Family Law practice areas such as Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce and Family Law matters.

LEGAL TERMS

LAWFUL ISSUE

Formerly, statutes governing wills used this phrase to specify children born to married parents, and to exclude those born out of wedlock. Now, the phrase means... (more...)
Formerly, statutes governing wills used this phrase to specify children born to married parents, and to exclude those born out of wedlock. Now, the phrase means the same as issue and 'lineal descendant.'

QMSCO

See Qualified Medical Child Support Order.

MARITAL TERMINATION AGREEMENT

See divorce agreement.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.

FOSTER CARE

Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents h... (more...)
Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents have a legal responsibility to care for their foster children, but do not have all the rights of a biological parent--for example, they may have limited rights to discipline the children, to raise them according to a certain religion or to authorize non-emergency medical procedures for them. The foster parents do not become the child's legal parents unless the biological parents' rights are terminated by a court and the foster parents adopt the child. This is not typically encouraged, as the goal of foster care is to provide temporary support for the children until they can be returned to their parents. See also foster child.

COMMUNITY PROPERTY

A method for defining the ownership of property acquired during marriage, in which all earnings during marriage and all property acquired with those earnings ar... (more...)
A method for defining the ownership of property acquired during marriage, in which all earnings during marriage and all property acquired with those earnings are considered community property and all debts incurred during marriage are community property debts. Community property laws exist in Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin. Compare equitable distribution and separate property.

INJUNCTION

A court decision that is intended to prevent harm--often irreparable harm--as distinguished from most court decisions, which are designed to provide a remedy fo... (more...)
A court decision that is intended to prevent harm--often irreparable harm--as distinguished from most court decisions, which are designed to provide a remedy for harm that has already occurred. Injunctions are orders that one side refrain from or stop certain actions, such as an order that an abusive spouse stay away from the other spouse or that a logging company not cut down first-growth trees. Injunctions can be temporary, pending a consideration of the issue later at trial (these are called interlocutory decrees or preliminary injunctions). Judges can also issue permanent injunctions at the end of trials, in which a party may be permanently prohibited from engaging in some conduct--for example, infringing a copyright or trademark or making use of illegally obtained trade secrets. Although most injunctions order a party not to do something, occasionally a court will issue a 'mandatory injunction' to order a party to carry out a positive act--for example, return stolen computer code.

BRIEF

A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she shoul... (more...)
A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she should prevail. These arguments must be supported by legal authority and precedent, such as statutes, regulations and previous court decisions. Although it is usually possible to submit a brief to a trial court (called a trial brief), briefs are most commonly used as a central part of the appeal process (an appellate brief). But don't be fooled by the name -- briefs are usually anything but brief, as pointed out by writer Franz Kafka, who defined a lawyer as 'a person who writes a 10,000 word decision and calls it a brief.'

ADOPTION

A court procedure by which an adult becomes the legal parent of someone who is not his or her biological child. Adoption creates a parent-child relationship rec... (more...)
A court procedure by which an adult becomes the legal parent of someone who is not his or her biological child. Adoption creates a parent-child relationship recognized for all legal purposes -- including child support obligations, inheritance rights and custody.