Collinston Child Custody Lawyer, Louisiana


Includes: Guardianships & Conservatorships, Custody & Visitation

Amy Coath Johnson Lawyer

Amy Coath Johnson

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Car Accident, Wills & Probate, Child Custody

Amy Johnson is a practicing lawyer in the state of Louisiana.

Amy  Coath Johnson Lawyer

Amy Coath Johnson

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Real Estate, Business

Our office is a new kind of law firm for a smaller community in a changing world. We are consistent, patient, professional, honest and fair - and we ... (more)

James L Carroll Lawyer

James L Carroll

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Real Estate, Estate, Accident & Injury

Born in New Orleans , Louisiana , July 18, 1963 ; admitted to bar 1989, New York; 1991, Texas ; 1999, New Mexico ; and 2003, Louisiana . Also admitted... (more)

Mary Alice Bryant Lawyer

Mary Alice Bryant

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Wills & Probate

Mary Bryant is a practicing lawyer in the state of Louisiana.

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April M. Hammett

Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Litigation, Medical Malpractice, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  9 Years

Bobby Noel Underwood

Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

Brady D King

Military, Divorce, Child Custody, Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Candace Lauren Bowen

Child Custody, Criminal, Insurance
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  3 Years

Catherine C Creed

Child Custody, Bankruptcy, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  25 Years

Charles H Heck

Child Custody, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  50 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.

CUSTODY (OF A CHILD)

The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When ... (more...)
The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When parents separate or divorce, one of the hardest decisions they have to make is which parent will have custody. The most common arrangement is for one parent to have custody (both physical and legal) while the other parent has a right of visitation. But it is not uncommon for the parents to share legal custody, even though one parent has physical custody. The most uncommon arrangement is for the parents to share both legal and physical custody.

NEXT OF KIN

The closest relatives, as defined by state law, of a deceased person. Most states recognize the spouse and the nearest blood relatives as next of kin.

COMMON LAW MARRIAGE

In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a marrie... (more...)
In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a married couple and intending to be married. Contrary to popular belief, the couple must intend to be married and act as though they are for a common law marriage to take effect -- merely living together for a long time won't do it.

CONSOLIDATED OMNIBUS BUDGET RECONCILIATION ACT (COBRA)

A federal law requiring that employers offer employees -- and their spouses and dependents -- continuing insurance coverage if their work hours are cut or they ... (more...)
A federal law requiring that employers offer employees -- and their spouses and dependents -- continuing insurance coverage if their work hours are cut or they lose their job for any reason other than gross misconduct. Courts are still in the process of determining the meaning of gross misconduct, but it's clearly more serious than poor performance or judgment. COBRA also makes an ex-spouse and children eligible to receive group rate health insurance provided by the other ex-spouse's employer for three years following a divorce.

ACCOMPANYING RELATIVE

An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card ca... (more...)
An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card can also obtain green cards or similar visas for accompanying relatives. Accompanying relatives include spouses and unmarried children under the age of 21.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.

DEFAULT DIVORCE

See uncontested divorce.

MARRIAGE LICENSE

A document that authorizes a couple to get married, usually available from the county clerk's office in the state where the marriage will take place. Couples pa... (more...)
A document that authorizes a couple to get married, usually available from the county clerk's office in the state where the marriage will take place. Couples pay a small fee for a marriage license, and must often wait a few days before it is issued. In addition, a few states require a short waiting period--usually not more than a day--between the time the license is issued and the time the marriage may take place. And some states still require blood tests for couples before they will issue a marriage license, though most no longer do.