Columbus Wills & Probate Lawyer, Arkansas


Includes: Estate Administration, Living Wills, Wills

Andrea Carroll Timmons

Commercial Real Estate, Oil & Gas, Wills, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

Clarke Douglas Arnold

Commercial Real Estate, Real Estate, Wills, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  30 Years

Clarke D. Arnold

Commercial Real Estate, Real Estate, Wills, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  30 Years

James H. Gunter

General Practice
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  48 Years
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Joshua Landes Potter

Wills, Family Law, Criminal, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  9 Years

Marshall Holman Moore

Juvenile Law, International Other, Wills, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Marshall Holman Moore

Juvenile Law, International Other, Wills, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  42 Years

Ronny J. Bell

Wills & Probate, Employee Rights, Criminal, Animal Bite
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  43 Years

William Bailey Roberts

International, Wills, Estate, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  58 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Easily find Columbus Wills & Probate Lawyers and Columbus Wills & Probate Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Estate areas including Estate Planning, Trusts and Power of Attorney attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

LAPSE

Under a will, the failure of a gift of property. A gift lapses when the beneficiary dies before the person who made the will, and no alternate has been named. S... (more...)
Under a will, the failure of a gift of property. A gift lapses when the beneficiary dies before the person who made the will, and no alternate has been named. Some states have anti-lapse statutes, which prevent gifts to relatives of the deceased person from lapsing unless the relative has no heirs of his or her own. A lapsed gift becomes part of the residuary estate.

CONSERVATOR

Someone appointed by a judge to oversee the affairs of an incapacitated person. A conservator who manages financial affairs is often called a 'conservator of th... (more...)
Someone appointed by a judge to oversee the affairs of an incapacitated person. A conservator who manages financial affairs is often called a 'conservator of the estate.' One who takes care of personal matters, such as healthcare and living arrangements, is known as a 'conservator of the person.' Sometimes, one conservator is appointed to handle all these tasks. Depending on where you live, a conservator may also be called a guardian, committee or curator.

PRETERMITTED HEIR

A child or spouse who is not mentioned in a will and whom the court believes was accidentally overlooked by the person who made the will. For example, a child b... (more...)
A child or spouse who is not mentioned in a will and whom the court believes was accidentally overlooked by the person who made the will. For example, a child born or adopted after the will is made may be deemed a pretermitted heir. If the court determines that an heir was accidentally omitted, that heir is entitled to receive the same share of the estate as she would have if the deceased had died without a will. A pretermitted heir is sometimes called an 'omitted heir.'

PROVING A WILL

Convincing a probate court that a document is truly the deceased person's will. Usually this is a simple formality that the executor or administrator easily sat... (more...)
Convincing a probate court that a document is truly the deceased person's will. Usually this is a simple formality that the executor or administrator easily satisfies by showing that the will was signed and dated by the deceased person in front of two or more witnesses. When the will is holographic -- that is, completely handwritten by the deceased and not witnessed, it is still valid in many states if the executor can produce relatives and friends to testify that the handwriting is that of the deceased.

SELF-PROVING WILL

A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-prov... (more...)
A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-proving when two witnesses sign under penalty of perjury that they observed the willmaker sign it and that he told them it was his will. If no one contests the validity of the will, the probate court will accept the will without hearing the testimony of the witnesses or other evidence. To make a self-proving will in other states, the willmaker and one or more witnesses must sign an affidavit (sworn statement) before a notary public certifying that the will is genuine and that all willmaking formalities have been observed.

TRUSTEE POWERS

The provisions in a trust document defining what the trustee may and may not do.

KINDRED

Under some state's probate codes, all relatives of a deceased person.

PER CAPITA

Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leavin... (more...)
Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leaving children of his or her own. For example, Fred leaves his house jointly to his son Alan and his daughter Julie. But Alan dies before Fred, leaving two young children. If Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per capita, Julie and the two grandchildren will each take a third. If, on the other hand, Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per stirpes, Julie will receive one-half of the property, and Alan's two children will share his half in equal shares (through Alan by right of representation).

BANKRUPTCY ESTATE

All of the property you own when you file for bankruptcy, except for most pensions and educational trusts. The trustee technically takes control of your bankrup... (more...)
All of the property you own when you file for bankruptcy, except for most pensions and educational trusts. The trustee technically takes control of your bankruptcy estate for the duration of your case.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Edwards v. Nelson

... Kenneth Edwards, Sr. died after a lengthy hospitalization at Mercy on April 4, 2003. On November 10, 2003, Kenneth Edwards, Jr. ("Edwards") was appointed as the administrator of his father's estate in Sebastian County Circuit Court, Probate Division, case number PR-2003 ...

Carmody v. Raymond James Financial Services, Inc.

... Appellants, Thomas G. Carmody and Dr. Norman C. Savers, Jr., as co-administrators on behalf of the Estate of Helen Virginia Coan, deceased, and on behalf of the heirs of Helen Virginia Coan, appeal the probate order compelling arbitration issued by the Ouachita County ...

Osborn v. Bryant

... 28-41-101 (Repl. 2004 & Supp.2007), and attached her father's will to the affidavit. The same day she filed the affidavit, Brenda also filed a "Notice of Probate." Proof of publication of the notice was subsequently filed on October 14, 1994. ...