Corydon Trusts Lawyer, Indiana


John Eric Colin

Trusts, Estate, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  22 Years

Harold E. Dillman

Real Estate, Dispute Resolution, Trusts, Elder Law, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Ronald Wayne Simpson

Real Estate, Trusts, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  41 Years

Rosalyn A. Carothers

Trusts, Estate Planning, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  31 Years
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Rosalyn A Carothers

Trusts, Estate Planning, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Rosalyn A. Carothers

Trusts, Estate Planning, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  31 Years

David A. Ehsan

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           

Gary Trent Banet

Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

Timothy J. Naville

Wills & Probate, Trusts, Estate Planning, Elder Law
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  30 Years

Stephen Timothy Naville

Trusts, Estate, Elder Law, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  14 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

EXECUTOR

The person named in a will to handle the property of someone who has died. The executor collects the property, pays debts and taxes, and then distributes what's... (more...)
The person named in a will to handle the property of someone who has died. The executor collects the property, pays debts and taxes, and then distributes what's left, as specified in the will. The executor also handles any probate court proceedings and notifies people and organizations of the death. Also called personal representatives.

EXEMPTION TRUST

A bypass trust funded with an amount no larger than the personal federal estate tax exemption in the year of death. If the trust grantor leaves property worth m... (more...)
A bypass trust funded with an amount no larger than the personal federal estate tax exemption in the year of death. If the trust grantor leaves property worth more than that amount, it usually goes to the surviving spouse. The trust property passes free from estate tax because of the personal exemption, and the rest is shielded from tax under the surviving spouse's marital deduction.

SECONDARY MEANING

In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use ... (more...)
In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use and exposure in the marketplace. For example, though first names are not generally considered inherently distinctive, Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream has become so well known that it is now entitled to maximum trademark protection.

IN TERROREM

Latin meaning 'in fear.' This phrase is used to describe provisions in contracts or wills meant to scare a person into complying with the terms of the agreement... (more...)
Latin meaning 'in fear.' This phrase is used to describe provisions in contracts or wills meant to scare a person into complying with the terms of the agreement. For example, a will might state that an heir will forfeit her inheritance if she challenges the validity of the will. Of course, if the will is challenged and found to be invalid, then the clause itself is also invalid and the heir takes whatever she would have inherited if there were no will.

DEVISEE

A person or entity who inherits real estate under the terms of a will.

ABATEMENT

A reduction. After a death, abatement occurs if the deceased person didn't leave enough property to fulfill all the bequests made in the will and meet other exp... (more...)
A reduction. After a death, abatement occurs if the deceased person didn't leave enough property to fulfill all the bequests made in the will and meet other expenses. Gifts left in the will are cut back in order to pay taxes, satisfy debts or take care of other gifts that are given priority under law or by the will itself.

TRUST MERGER

Under a trust, the situation that occurs when the sole trustee and the sole beneficiary are the same person or institution. Then, there's no longer the separati... (more...)
Under a trust, the situation that occurs when the sole trustee and the sole beneficiary are the same person or institution. Then, there's no longer the separation between the trustee's legal ownership of trust property from the beneficiary's interest. The trust 'merges' and ceases to exist.

INHERIT

To receive property from someone who has died. Traditionally, the word 'inherit' applied only when one received property from a relative who died without a will... (more...)
To receive property from someone who has died. Traditionally, the word 'inherit' applied only when one received property from a relative who died without a will. Currently, however, the word is used whenever someone receives property from the estate of a deceased person.

DISINHERIT

To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit prope... (more...)
To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit property -- a close family member, for example -- should not receive it. In most states, you cannot completely disinherit your spouse; a surviving spouse has the right to claim a portion (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's estate. With a few exceptions, however, you can expressly disinherit children.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Zoeller v. East Chicago Second Century

... It argues on appeal that it was established under the agreement to benefit as a private for-profit corporation, and that "this non-charitable component eliminates the possibility that a public charitable trust was created," citing the definition of such trusts, Ind.Code § 30-4-1-2(5 ...

Carlson v. Sweeney, Dabagia, Donoghue, Thorne, Janes & Pagos

Norman R. CARLSON, Jr., Individually and As Executor of the Estates of Norman R. Carlson and Hilda D. Carlson, Deceased, and As Trustee of the Trusts Established Under the Last Wills and Testaments of Norman R. Carlson and Hilda D. Carlson; Margaret Ann Carlson; Beth ...

Gibbs v. Kashak

... OPINION. MAY, Judge. Sally Gibbs and Jack David Kashak are siblings and the beneficiaries of their parents' trusts. ... Norbert and Eileen each created a trust and deeded their assets, including the land, bank accounts, and stocks to their trusts. ...