Dearborn Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Missouri


Douglas Max Tschauder Lawyer

Douglas Max Tschauder

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Business, Real Estate, Trusts

Doug helps individuals and families in Missouri and Kansas to resolve their legal and estate planning issues. He graduated from the University of Kan... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-942-8620

Anne Virginia Kiske Lawyer

Anne Virginia Kiske

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Child Custody, Divorce, Estate
We offer services in family law, divorce, child custody, probate, estate planning and traffic

At the Kiske Law Office, LLC, I am responsible for child custody cases, child abuse cases, divorces, paternities, guardianships, and traffic matters, ... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-895-7490

Kathy Kranitz Sadoun

Farms, Divorce, Child Support, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           

Theodore M. Kranitz

Wills & Probate, Workers' Compensation, Family Law, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Hugh D. Kranitz

Wills, Workers' Compensation, Family Law, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Amy M Combs

Adoption, Child Support, Constitutional Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Mark Allen Campbell

Estate Planning, Adoption, Corporate, Defamation & Slander
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  5 Years

Robert Charles Black

Traffic, Dispute Resolution, Family Law, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           

Suzanne Marie Kissock

Juvenile Law, Dispute Resolution, Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Elizabeth Ann Hodges

Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Dispute Resolution, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Dearborn Divorce & Family Law Lawyers and Dearborn Divorce & Family Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Divorce & Family Law practice areas such as Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce and Family Law matters.

LEGAL TERMS

RESPONDENT

A term used instead of defendant or appellee in some states -- especially for divorce and other family law cases -- to identify the party who is sued and must r... (more...)
A term used instead of defendant or appellee in some states -- especially for divorce and other family law cases -- to identify the party who is sued and must respond to the petitioner's complaint.

MARITAL PROPERTY

Most of the property accumulated by spouses during a marriage, called community property in some states. States differ as to exactly what is included in marital... (more...)
Most of the property accumulated by spouses during a marriage, called community property in some states. States differ as to exactly what is included in marital property; some states include all property and earnings dring the marriage, while others exclude gifts and inheritances.

STIRPES

A term used in wills that refers to descendants of a common ancestor or branch of a family.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.

MISREPRESENTATION

A lie by one spouse before marriage that provides grounds for an annulment. For example, if a spouse failed to mention that he was still married or was incapabl... (more...)
A lie by one spouse before marriage that provides grounds for an annulment. For example, if a spouse failed to mention that he was still married or was incapable of having children, he has misrepresented himself.

SOLE CUSTODY

An arrangement whereby only one parent has physical and legal custody of a child and the other parent has visitation rights.

ANNULMENT

A court procedure that dissolves a marriage and treats it as if it never happened. Annulments are rare since the advent of no-fault divorce but may be obtained ... (more...)
A court procedure that dissolves a marriage and treats it as if it never happened. Annulments are rare since the advent of no-fault divorce but may be obtained in most states for one of the following reasons: misrepresentation, concealment (for example, of an addiction or criminal record), misunderstanding and refusal to consummate the marriage.

BEST INTERESTS (OF THE CHILD)

The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best inter... (more...)
The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best interests of the child. Similarly, when asked to decide on custody issues in a divorce case, the judge will base his or her decision on the child's best interests. And the same test is used when judges decide whether a child should be removed from a parent's home because of neglect or abuse. Factors considered by the court in deciding the best interests of a child include: age and sex of the child mental and physical health of the child mental and physical health of the parents lifestyle and other social factors of the parents emotional ties between the parents and the child ability of the parents to provide the child with food, shelter, clothing and medical care established living pattern for the child concerning school, home, community and religious institution quality of schooling, and the child's preference.

FAMILY COURT

A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), ch... (more...)
A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), child custody and support, guardianship, adoption, and other cases having to do with family-related issues, including the issuance of restraining orders in domestic violence cases.