Doe Run Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Missouri, page 2


Kelli Marie Guilliams

Bankruptcy, Elder Law, Family Law, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  10 Years

Sarah E Margulis

Adoption, Juvenile Law, Family Law, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  7 Years

Suzan Kay Ponder-bates

Juvenile Law, Dispute Resolution, Family Law, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           

Sarah E. Donahue

Divorce & Family Law, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Patrick Joseph Malone

Workers' Compensation, Adoption, Corporate, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Michele Kaido Schwent

Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Bankruptcy & Debt, Contract
Status:  In Good Standing           

Deron Levan Sugg

Landlord-Tenant, Traffic, Family Law, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Joseph P Cunningham III

Employment, Family Law, Traffic, Workers' Compensation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Tim Pudlowski

Family Law, Child Support, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Ajla Alunovic

Car Accident, Elder Law, Adoption, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  7 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

NEXT OF KIN

The closest relatives, as defined by state law, of a deceased person. Most states recognize the spouse and the nearest blood relatives as next of kin.

MARRIAGE LICENSE

A document that authorizes a couple to get married, usually available from the county clerk's office in the state where the marriage will take place. Couples pa... (more...)
A document that authorizes a couple to get married, usually available from the county clerk's office in the state where the marriage will take place. Couples pay a small fee for a marriage license, and must often wait a few days before it is issued. In addition, a few states require a short waiting period--usually not more than a day--between the time the license is issued and the time the marriage may take place. And some states still require blood tests for couples before they will issue a marriage license, though most no longer do.

STIRPES

A term used in wills that refers to descendants of a common ancestor or branch of a family.

FMLA

See Family and Medical Leave Act.

CONFIDENTIAL COMMUNICATION

Information exchanged between two people who (1) have a relationship in which private communications are protected by law, and (2) intend that the information b... (more...)
Information exchanged between two people who (1) have a relationship in which private communications are protected by law, and (2) intend that the information be kept in confidence. The law recognizes certain parties whose communications will be considered confidential and protected, including spouses, doctor and patient, attorney and client, and priest and confessor. Communications between these individuals cannot be disclosed in court unless the protected party waives that protection. The intention that the communication be confidential is critical. For example, if an attorney and his client are discussing a matter in the presence of an unnecessary third party -- for example, in an elevator with other people present -- the discussion will not be considered confidential and may be admitted at trial. Also known as privileged communication.

ADOPT

(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative bo... (more...)
(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative body may adopt a law or an amendment, a government agency may adopt a regulation or a party to a lawsuit may adopt a particular argument.

STEPPARENT ADOPTION

The formal, legal adoption of a child by a stepparent who is living with a legal parent. Most states have special provisions making stepparent adoptions relativ... (more...)
The formal, legal adoption of a child by a stepparent who is living with a legal parent. Most states have special provisions making stepparent adoptions relatively easy if the child's noncustodial parent gives consent, is dead or missing, or has abandoned the child.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge ... (more...)
An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge on her own (sua sponte). For example, in a divorce, at the request of one parent a judge might issue an order directing the other parent to appear in court on a particular date and time to show cause why the first parent should not be given sole physical custody of the children. Although it would seem that the person receiving an order to show cause is at a procedural disadvantage--she, after all, is the one who is told to come up with a convincing reason why the judge shouldn't order something--both sides normally have an equal chance to convince the judge to rule in their favor.

SHARED CUSTODY

See joint custody.