Elizabethport Bankruptcy Lawyer, New Jersey

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Includes: Bankruptcy Litigation, Commercial Bankruptcy, Consumer Bankruptcy, Dissolution

Leah Capece

Credit & Debt, Collection, Bankruptcy, Bankruptcy & Debt

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Mary Mcfield

Commercial Real Estate, Bankruptcy, Personal Injury, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Caroline Cooper

Corporate, Bankruptcy, Intellectual Property
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Mary Ann Olsen

Bankruptcy, Elder Law, Family Law
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Daniel Pacilio

Business, Bankruptcy
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Anayancy Housman

Immigration, Bankruptcy
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Anayancy Housman

Immigration, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

LIMITED LIABILITY

The maximum amount a business owner can lose if the business is subject to debts, claims or other liabilities. An owner of a limited liability company (LLC) or ... (more...)
The maximum amount a business owner can lose if the business is subject to debts, claims or other liabilities. An owner of a limited liability company (LLC) or a person who invests in a corporation (a shareholder) generally stands to lose only the amount of money invested in the business. This means that if the business folds, creditors cannot seize or sell an owner's home, car, or other personal assets.

LIEN

The right of a secured creditor to grab a specific item of property if you don't pay a debt. Liens you agree to are called security interests, and include mortg... (more...)
The right of a secured creditor to grab a specific item of property if you don't pay a debt. Liens you agree to are called security interests, and include mortgages, home equity loans, car loans and personal loans for which you pledge property to guarantee repayment. Liens created without your consent are called nonconsensual liens, and include judgment liens (liens filed by a creditor who has sued you and obtained a judgment), tax liens and mechanics liens (liens filed by a contractor who worked on your house but wasn't paid).

NONEXEMPT PROPERTY

The property you risk losing to your creditors when you file a Chapter 7 bankruptcy or when a creditor sues you and wins a judgment. Nonexempt property typicall... (more...)
The property you risk losing to your creditors when you file a Chapter 7 bankruptcy or when a creditor sues you and wins a judgment. Nonexempt property typically includes valuable clothing (furs) and electronic equipment, an expensive car that's been paid off and most of the equity in your house. Compare exempt property.

LIMITED PARTNERSHIP

A business structure that allows one or more partners (called limited partners) to enjoy limited personal liability for partnership debts while another partner ... (more...)
A business structure that allows one or more partners (called limited partners) to enjoy limited personal liability for partnership debts while another partner or partners (called general partners) have unlimited personal liability. The key difference between a general and limited partner concerns management decision making--general partners run the business, and limited partners, who are usually passive investors, are not allowed to make day-to-day business decisions. If they do, they risk being treated as general partners with unlimited personal liability.

CREDITOR

A person or entity (such as a bank) to whom a debt is owed.

CONSUMER CREDIT COUNSELING SERVICE (CCCS)

A national non-profit agency that, at no cost, helps debtors plan budgets and repay their debts. One major criticism of CCCS is that each office is primarily fu... (more...)
A national non-profit agency that, at no cost, helps debtors plan budgets and repay their debts. One major criticism of CCCS is that each office is primarily funded by voluntary donations from the creditors that receive payments from debtors repaying their debts through that office. Despite this criticism, most CCCS counselors provide clients with thorough and neutral advice.

LIQUIDATING PARTNER

The member of an insolvent or dissolving partnership responsible for paying the debts and settling the accounts of the partnership.

DOING BUSINESS AS (DBA)

A situation in which a business owner operates a company under a name different from his or her real name. The owner must file a 'fictitious name statement' or ... (more...)
A situation in which a business owner operates a company under a name different from his or her real name. The owner must file a 'fictitious name statement' or similar document with the appropriate agency -- for example, the county clerk. This enables consumers to discover the names of the business owners, which is important if a consumer needs to sue the business.

CREDIT INSURANCE

Insurance a lender requires a borrower to purchase to cover the loan. If the borrower dies or becomes disabled before paying off the loan, the policy will pay o... (more...)
Insurance a lender requires a borrower to purchase to cover the loan. If the borrower dies or becomes disabled before paying off the loan, the policy will pay off the remaining balance. Federal and state consumer protection laws require the lender to disclose to existing and potential borrowers the terms and costs of obtaining credit insurance because it can affect the terms of the loan.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Spring Creek Holding Company, Inc. v. Shinnihon USA Co., Ltd.

... PNY failed to make some of the tax payments. In 1994, PNY filed for bankruptcy. In 1998, through the bankruptcy proceedings, Seasons Investment Corporation (SIC) purchased for $9.1 million the hotel and PNY's right to reacquire from Shinnihon the Remainder Property. ...

EMC Mortg. Corp. v. Chaudhri

... Unicor then sought protection under the Bankruptcy Code. Plaintiff EMC Mortgage Corporation (EMC) purchased the Chaudhris' mortgage at a bankruptcy sale. EMC received an assignment of the mortgage and proceeded on Unicor's behalf to prosecute the foreclosure action. ...

US EX REL. USDA v. Scurry

... On April 1, 2004, after the final judgment of foreclosure was entered but before title, possession and ejectment were sought, defendant sought protection from her creditors pursuant to Chapter XIII of the United States Bankruptcy Code, [1] 11 USC §§ 1301-1330, a step that ...