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Feasterville Trevose Bankruptcy & Debt Lawyer, Pennsylvania


Eric S. Nash Lawyer

Eric S. Nash

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Workers' Compensation, Bankruptcy & Debt, Health Care, Domestic Violence & Neglect

I have always been a lawyer who prided myself on the “service” aspect of my profession! Perhaps it’s from my humble upbringing in Northeast Phil... (more)

Michael P Kelly Lawyer

Michael P Kelly

VERIFIED
Bankruptcy & Debt, Accident & Injury, Estate, Real Estate, Wills & Probate

Michael P. Kelly has been a resident of Bucks County all of his life except for the three years that he attended the University of Baltimore School of... (more)

Joshua Z. Goldblum

Bankruptcy, Child Support, Consumer Bankruptcy, Farms, Workout
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Michael S. Schwartz

Banking & Finance, Bankruptcy, Corporate, Contract, Credit & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Kenneth G. Harrison

Bankruptcy, Business Organization, Child Support, Collection, Farms
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Stanton M. Lacks

Bankruptcy, Collection, Criminal, DUI-DWI, Credit & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           

Mike Schwartz

Bankruptcy & Debt, Bankruptcy, Foreclosure, Estate, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Paul Young

Social Security, Criminal, DUI-DWI, Bankruptcy & Debt, Accident & Injury

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Paul Gregory Lang

Criminal, Bankruptcy & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  9 Years

Michael Patrick Derose

Contract, Landlord-Tenant, Collection, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Feasterville Trevose Bankruptcy & Debt Lawyers and Feasterville Trevose Bankruptcy & Debt Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Bankruptcy & Debt practice areas such as Bankruptcy, Collection, Credit & Debt, Reorganization and Workout matters.

LEGAL TERMS

NUISANCE FEES

Money charged by some credit card companies to increase their profits when you fail to use the card the way the creditor wants. Examples include late payment fe... (more...)
Money charged by some credit card companies to increase their profits when you fail to use the card the way the creditor wants. Examples include late payment fees, inactivity fees and fees for not carrying a balance from month to month. It's best to shop around and get rid of cards that have these fees attached.

TRADE NAME

The official name of a business, the one it uses on its letterhead and bank account when not dealing with consumers.

NONDISCHARGEABLE DEBTS

Debts that cannot be erased by filing for bankruptcy. If you file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, these debts will remain when your case is over. If you file for Chap... (more...)
Debts that cannot be erased by filing for bankruptcy. If you file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, these debts will remain when your case is over. If you file for Chapter 13 bankruptcy, the nondischargeable debts will have to be paid in full during your plan or you will have a balance at the end of your case. Examples of nondischargeable debts include alimony and child support, most income tax debts, many student loans and debts for personal injury or death caused by drunk driving. Compare dischargeable debts.

BANKRUPTCY

A legal proceeding that relieves you of the responsibility of paying your debts or provides you with protection while attempting to repay your debts. There are ... (more...)
A legal proceeding that relieves you of the responsibility of paying your debts or provides you with protection while attempting to repay your debts. There are two types of bankruptcies -- liquidation, in which your debts are wiped out (discharged) and reorganization, in which you provide the court with a plan for how you intend to repay your debts. For both consumers and business, liquidation bankruptcy is called Chapter 7. For consumers, reorganization bankruptcy is called Chapter 13. Reorganization bankruptcy for consumers with an extraordinary amount of debt and for businesses is called Chapter 11. Reorganization bankruptcy for family farmers is called Chapter 12.

LIABILITY

(1) The state of being liable--that is, legally responsible for an act or omission. Example:Peri hires Paul to fix a broken pipe in her bathroom, but the new pi... (more...)
(1) The state of being liable--that is, legally responsible for an act or omission. Example:Peri hires Paul to fix a broken pipe in her bathroom, but the new pipe bursts the day after Paul installs it, ruining the bathroom floor. This raises the issue of liability: Who is responsible for the damage? Peri claims that Paul is responsible, and sues him for the cost of hiring another plumber to fix the pipe and replacing the floor. Paul, in turn, claims that the pipe manufacturer is responsible, because they supplied him with faulty materials. Both Peri and Paul must prove their claims in court; if Paul and/or the manufacturer is found liable, one or both will have to pay damages to Peri. (2) Something for which a person is liable. For example, a debt is often called a liability.

NONEXEMPT PROPERTY

The property you risk losing to your creditors when you file a Chapter 7 bankruptcy or when a creditor sues you and wins a judgment. Nonexempt property typicall... (more...)
The property you risk losing to your creditors when you file a Chapter 7 bankruptcy or when a creditor sues you and wins a judgment. Nonexempt property typically includes valuable clothing (furs) and electronic equipment, an expensive car that's been paid off and most of the equity in your house. Compare exempt property.

SUBROGATION

A taking on of the legal rights of someone whose debts or expenses have been paid. For example, subrogation occurs when an insurance company that has paid off i... (more...)
A taking on of the legal rights of someone whose debts or expenses have been paid. For example, subrogation occurs when an insurance company that has paid off its injured claimant takes the legal rights the claimant has against a third party that caused the injury, and sues that third party.

S CORPORATION

A term that describes a profit-making corporation organized under state law whose shareholders have applied for and received subchapter S corporation status fro... (more...)
A term that describes a profit-making corporation organized under state law whose shareholders have applied for and received subchapter S corporation status from the Internal Revenue Service. Electing to do business as an S corporation lets shareholders enjoy limited liability status, as would be true of any corporation, but be taxed like a partnership or sole proprietor. That is, instead of being taxed as a separate entity (as would be the case with a regular or C corporation) an S corporation is a pass-through tax entity: income taxes are reported and paid by the shareholders, not the S corporation. To qualify as an S corporation a number of IRS rules must be met, such as a limit of 75 shareholders and citizenship requirements.

GRACE PERIOD

A period of time during which you are not required to make payments on a debt. For example, most credit cards give you a grace period of 20-30 days before you h... (more...)
A period of time during which you are not required to make payments on a debt. For example, most credit cards give you a grace period of 20-30 days before you have to pay interest on the amount of your purchases. Cash advances, however, usually have no grace period; interest begins to accumulate from the date of the withdrawal, even if you pay your bills on time. Also, some student loans give you a grace period after graduating or dropping out of school. During this time, you are not required to make payments on your loan.