Fort Smith Family Law Lawyer, Arkansas


Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Kevin Lee Hickey

Motor Vehicle, Employment, Family Law, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Samuel M. Terry

Family Law, Mental Health, Insurance, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

C. Ryan Norton

Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Robert M. Honea

Family Law, Litigation, Oil & Gas, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Wyman R. Wade

Municipal, Employment, Family Law, Collection
Status:  In Good Standing           

Michael Alan Lafreniere

Real Estate, Estate Planning, Family Law, Civil Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           

Andrew Alex Flake

Social Security, Bankruptcy, DUI-DWI, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Rex M. Terry

Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation, Oil & Gas
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  44 Years

Coy J. Rush

Bankruptcy, Social Security, Traffic, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  46 Years

Leta J. Caplinger

Family Law, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

CHILD

(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born o... (more...)
(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born outside of marriage. (2) A person under an age specified by law, often 14 or 16. For example, state law may require a person to be over the age of 14 to make a valid will, or may define the crime of statutory rape as sex with a person under the age of 16. In this sense, a child can be distinguished from a minor, who is a person under the age of 18 in most states. A person below the specified legal age who is married is often considered an adult rather than a child. See also emancipation.

MEDIAN FAMILY INCOME

An annual income figure for which there are as many families with incomes below that level as there are above that level. The Census Bureau publishes median fam... (more...)
An annual income figure for which there are as many families with incomes below that level as there are above that level. The Census Bureau publishes median family income figures for each state and for different family sizes. A debtor whose current monthly income is higher than the median family income in his or her state must pass the means test in order to file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, and must commit all disposable income to a five-year repayment plan if filing for Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

IRREMEDIABLE OR IRRETRIEVABLE BREAKDOWN

The situation that occurs in a marriage when one spouse refuses to live with the other and will not work toward reconciliation. In a number of states, irremedia... (more...)
The situation that occurs in a marriage when one spouse refuses to live with the other and will not work toward reconciliation. In a number of states, irremediable breakdown is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into whether the marriage has actually broken down, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the marriage has fallen apart. Compare incompatibility; irreconcilable differences.

MARITAL TERMINATION AGREEMENT

See divorce agreement.

MARITAL SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT

See divorce agreement.

MARITAL PROPERTY

Most of the property accumulated by spouses during a marriage, called community property in some states. States differ as to exactly what is included in marital... (more...)
Most of the property accumulated by spouses during a marriage, called community property in some states. States differ as to exactly what is included in marital property; some states include all property and earnings dring the marriage, while others exclude gifts and inheritances.

ADOPTED CHILD

Any person, whether an adult or a minor, who is legally adopted as the child of another in a court proceeding. See adoption.

PETITION (IMMIGRATION)

A formal request for a green card or a specific nonimmigrant (temporary) visa. In many cases, the petition must be filed by someone sponsoring the immigrant, su... (more...)
A formal request for a green card or a specific nonimmigrant (temporary) visa. In many cases, the petition must be filed by someone sponsoring the immigrant, such as a family member or employer. After the petition is approved, the immigrant may submit the actual visa or green card application.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Arkansas Department of Human Services v. FAMILY COUNCIL ACTION COMMITTEE

... this state have a duty to protect the best interest of the child. We will discuss this issue more fully below. III. Cohabitation in Family Law Cases. The State and FCAC base a considerable part of their argument on their assertion ...

Seidenstricker Farms v. DOSS FAMILY TRUST

... Doss, Individually and as Trustee of the Warren N. Doss and Etta A. Doss Family Trust, Etta A. Doss, Individually and as Trustee of the Warren N. Doss and Etta A. Doss Family Trust, Appellees. No. 07-786. Supreme Court of Arkansas. January 10, 2008. 843 Berry Law Firm, by ...

CV's Family Foods v. Caverly

... The appellant, CV's Family Foods, appeals from the Arkansas Workers' Compensation Commission's award of medical expenses and temporary-total disability ... We held in Hightower that the premises exception to the going-and-coming rule was no longer the law in Arkansas ...