Fort Wayne DUI-DWI Lawyer, Indiana


Michael Richard McEntee Lawyer

Michael Richard McEntee

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Workers' Compensation, Divorce & Family Law, DUI-DWI, Wills & Probate
General Practice and Workers Compensation since 1977

My name is Mike McEntee and I have been practicing law in Fort Wayne for over thirty years. I was born and raised here and my three children all went ... (more)

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800-782-2061

Michael T. Douglass

Family Law, Child Support, Adoption, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Gregory A. Miller

Motor Vehicle, Divorce & Family Law, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Ryan E. Lackey

DUI-DWI, Criminal, Business, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Cody Richard Williams

Landlord-Tenant, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  10 Years

Lindsey Creigh Swanson

Power of Attorney, Real Estate, Employment, Accident & Injury, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  11 Years

Donald C. Swanson

DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  48 Years

Tracey Lee Rosswurm

Landlord-Tenant, DUI-DWI, Consumer Rights, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           

Ryan Matthew Gardner

Dispute Resolution, Wrongful Termination, Child Custody, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  9 Years

Robert H. Bellinger

Government, Divorce & Family Law, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  14 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

GREEN CARD

The well-known term for an Alien Registration Receipt Card. This plastic photo identification card is given to individuals who are legal permanent residents of ... (more...)
The well-known term for an Alien Registration Receipt Card. This plastic photo identification card is given to individuals who are legal permanent residents of the United States. It serves as a U.S. entry document in place of a visa, enabling permanent residents to return to the United States after temporary absences. The key characteristic of a green card is that it allows the holder to live permanently in the United States. Unless you abandon your residence or violate certain criminal or immigration laws, your green card can never be taken away. Possession of a green card also allows you to work in the United States legally. Those who hold green cards for a certain length of time may eventually apply for U.S. citizenship. Green cards have an expiration date of ten years from issuance. This does not mean that your permanent resident status expires. You must simply apply for a new card.

ARREST WARRANT

A document issued by a judge or magistrate that authorizes the police to arrest someone. Warrants are issued when law enforcement personnel present evidence to ... (more...)
A document issued by a judge or magistrate that authorizes the police to arrest someone. Warrants are issued when law enforcement personnel present evidence to the judge or magistrate that convinces her that it is reasonably likely that a crime has taken place and that the person to be named in the warrant is criminally responsible for that crime.

LARCENY

Another term for theft. Although the definition of this term differs from state to state, it typically means taking property belonging to another with the inten... (more...)
Another term for theft. Although the definition of this term differs from state to state, it typically means taking property belonging to another with the intent to permanently deprive the owner of the property. If the taking is non forceful, it is larceny; if it is accompanied by force or fear directed against a person, it is robbery, a much more serious offense.

INADMISSIBLE EVIDENCE

Testimony or other evidence that fails to meet state or federal court rules governing the types of evidence that can be presented to a judge or jury. The main r... (more...)
Testimony or other evidence that fails to meet state or federal court rules governing the types of evidence that can be presented to a judge or jury. The main reason why evidence is ruled inadmissible is because it falls into a category deemed so unreliable that a court should not consider it as part of a deciding a case --for example, hearsay evidence, or an expert's opinion that is not based on facts generally accepted in the field. Evidence will also be declared inadmissible if it suffers from some other defect--for example, as compared to its value, it will take too long to present or risks enflaming the jury, as might be the case with graphic pictures of a homicide victim. In addition, in criminal cases, evidence that is gathered using illegal methods is commonly ruled inadmissible. Because the rules of evidence are so complicated (and because contesting lawyers waste so much time arguing over them) there is a strong trend towards using mediation or arbitration to resolve civil disputes. In mediation and arbitration, virtually all evidence can be considered. See evidence, admissible evidence.

INDECENT EXPOSURE

Revealing one's genitals under circumstances likely to offend others. Exposure is indecent under the law whenever a reasonable person would or should know that ... (more...)
Revealing one's genitals under circumstances likely to offend others. Exposure is indecent under the law whenever a reasonable person would or should know that his act may be seen by others--for example, in a public place or through an open window--and that it is likely to cause affront or alarm. Indecent exposure is considered a misdemeanor in most states.

IMPRISON

To put a person in prison or jail or otherwise confine him as punishment for committing a crime.

MOTION IN LIMINE

A request submitted to the court before trial in an attempt to exclude evidence from the proceedings. A motion in limine is usually made by a party when simply ... (more...)
A request submitted to the court before trial in an attempt to exclude evidence from the proceedings. A motion in limine is usually made by a party when simply the mention of the evidence would prejudice the jury against that party, even if the judge later instructed the jury to disregard the evidence. For example, if a defendant in a criminal trial were questioned and confessed to the crime without having been read his Miranda rights, his lawyer would file a motion in limine to keep evidence of the confession out of the trial.

CRIMINAL LAW

Laws written by Congress and state legislators that make certain behavior illegal and punishable by fines and/or imprisonment. By contrast, civil laws are not p... (more...)
Laws written by Congress and state legislators that make certain behavior illegal and punishable by fines and/or imprisonment. By contrast, civil laws are not punishable by imprisonment. In order to be found guilty of a criminal law, the prosecution must show that the defendant intended to act as he did; in civil law, you may sometimes be responsible for your actions even though you did not intend the consequences. For example, civil law makes you financially responsible for a car accident you caused but didn't intend.

NOLO CONTENDERE

A plea entered by the defendant in response to being charged with a crime. If a defendant pleads nolo contendere, she neither admits nor denies that she committ... (more...)
A plea entered by the defendant in response to being charged with a crime. If a defendant pleads nolo contendere, she neither admits nor denies that she committed the crime, but agrees to a punishment (usually a fine or jail time) as if guilty. Usually, this type of plea is entered because it can't be used as an admission of guilt if a civil case is held after the criminal trial.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Guy v. COM'R, BUREAU OF MOTOR VEHICLES

... We therefore vacate the trial court's order. Facts and Procedural History. In 2001 Guy lived in Florida. He was required by the Florida Department of Motor Vehicles ("Florida DMV") to attend a lifetime DUI school as a condition of maintaining his Florida driver license. Tr. p. 5. ...

Hamilton v. State

... victims. This was a single occurrence involving a single victim. Hamilton does have a criminal history but the presentence report reveals only two known convictions, a 1982 felony robbery and a 2002 misdemeanor DUI. Finally ...

Guy v. COMMISSIONER, INDIANA BUREAU OF MOTOR VEHICLES

... We therefore vacate the trial court's order. Facts and Procedural History. In 2001 Guy lived in Florida. He was required by the Florida Department of Motor Vehicles ("Florida DMV") to attend a lifetime DUI school as a condition of maintaining his Florida driver license. Tr. p. 5. ...