Gainesville Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Florida

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Christian A. Straile Lawyer

Christian A. Straile

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Criminal, DUI-DWI, Traffic, Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury
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This trial focused practice has the goals of delivering quality legal services, providing to clients personal services while developing strong, truste... (more)

William  Falik Lawyer

William Falik

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Divorce & Family Law, Civil & Human Rights, Family Law, Criminal

At the Law Office of William Falik, P.A., we represent our clients to assist them with civil and business disputes, family and domestic matters, and c... (more)

Sabina  Tomshinsky Lawyer

Sabina Tomshinsky

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Divorce & Family Law, Paternity, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Landlord-Tenant

What differentiates you from other lawyers in your community? From your very first contact with our firm, you'll come to realize that we genuinely ... (more)

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Mark Joseph Fraser Lawyer

Mark Joseph Fraser

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Divorce & Family Law, Business, Real Estate, Bankruptcy & Debt, Construction

After graduating from the University of Florida College of Law in 1996, Mr. Fraser began his career as a trial attorney with the law firm of Watson, F... (more)

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Steve D. Tran

Administrative Law, Alimony & Spousal Support, Animal Bite, Corporate
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Brian C. Toundas

Family Law, Divorce, Farms, Child Support
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Jonathan P Culver

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Children's Rights
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Stephen K. Miller

Family Law, Medical Malpractice, Wills & Probate, Collaborative Law
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Natasha R. Scheer

Family Law, Medical Malpractice, Wills & Probate, Premises Liability
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Stephanie N. Mack

Family Law, Medical Malpractice, Wills & Probate, Premises Liability
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LEGAL TERMS

INJUNCTION

A court decision that is intended to prevent harm--often irreparable harm--as distinguished from most court decisions, which are designed to provide a remedy fo... (more...)
A court decision that is intended to prevent harm--often irreparable harm--as distinguished from most court decisions, which are designed to provide a remedy for harm that has already occurred. Injunctions are orders that one side refrain from or stop certain actions, such as an order that an abusive spouse stay away from the other spouse or that a logging company not cut down first-growth trees. Injunctions can be temporary, pending a consideration of the issue later at trial (these are called interlocutory decrees or preliminary injunctions). Judges can also issue permanent injunctions at the end of trials, in which a party may be permanently prohibited from engaging in some conduct--for example, infringing a copyright or trademark or making use of illegally obtained trade secrets. Although most injunctions order a party not to do something, occasionally a court will issue a 'mandatory injunction' to order a party to carry out a positive act--for example, return stolen computer code.

PREMARITAL AGREEMENT

An agreement made by a couple before marriage that controls certain aspects of their relationship, usually the management and ownership of property, and sometim... (more...)
An agreement made by a couple before marriage that controls certain aspects of their relationship, usually the management and ownership of property, and sometimes whether alimony will be paid if the couple later divorces. Courts usually honor premarital agreements unless one person shows that the agreement was likely to promote divorce, was written with the intention of divorcing or was entered into unfairly. A premarital agreement may also be known as a 'prenuptial agreement.'

UNCONTESTED DIVORCE

A divorce automatically granted by a court when the spouse who is served with a summons and complaint for divorce fails to file a formal response with the court... (more...)
A divorce automatically granted by a court when the spouse who is served with a summons and complaint for divorce fails to file a formal response with the court. Many divorces proceed this way when the spouses have worked everything out and there's no reason for both to go to court -- and pay the court costs.

FITNESS

The ability of a prospective adoptive parent to provide for the best interests of a child. A court may consider many aspects of the prospective parents' lives i... (more...)
The ability of a prospective adoptive parent to provide for the best interests of a child. A court may consider many aspects of the prospective parents' lives in evaluating their fitness to adopt a child, including financial stability, marital stability, career obligations, other children, physical and mental health and criminal history.

GUARDIANSHIP

A legal relationship created by a court between a guardian and his ward--either a minor child or an incapacitated adult. The guardian has a legal right and duty... (more...)
A legal relationship created by a court between a guardian and his ward--either a minor child or an incapacitated adult. The guardian has a legal right and duty to care for the ward. This may involve making personal decisions on his or her behalf, managing property or both. Guardianships of incapacitated adults are more typically called conservatorships .

DISSOLUTION

A term used instead of divorce in some states.

MARITAL PROPERTY

Most of the property accumulated by spouses during a marriage, called community property in some states. States differ as to exactly what is included in marital... (more...)
Most of the property accumulated by spouses during a marriage, called community property in some states. States differ as to exactly what is included in marital property; some states include all property and earnings dring the marriage, while others exclude gifts and inheritances.

MEDIAN FAMILY INCOME

An annual income figure for which there are as many families with incomes below that level as there are above that level. The Census Bureau publishes median fam... (more...)
An annual income figure for which there are as many families with incomes below that level as there are above that level. The Census Bureau publishes median family income figures for each state and for different family sizes. A debtor whose current monthly income is higher than the median family income in his or her state must pass the means test in order to file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, and must commit all disposable income to a five-year repayment plan if filing for Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.