Glen Allen Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Virginia


Elizabeth Farrar Egan Lawyer

Elizabeth Farrar Egan

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law

Elizabeth Egan is a practicing lawyer in the state of Virginia.

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

804-353-1971

Stephen Arthur Bryant Lawyer

Stephen Arthur Bryant

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Traffic, Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law

Steve Bryant is a member of the firm’s litigation section. Steve defends clients charged with serious traffic offenses including DUIs; he was recen... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

804-262-3600

Aubrey Hampton Brown III Lawyer

Aubrey Hampton Brown III

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Real Estate, Residential Real Estate, Divorce, Car Accident

Aubrey Brown is a member of the firm’s litigation section, and was named a shareholder in 2018. His practice crosses multiple areas of law, consist... (more)

Dimitrios  Karles Lawyer

Dimitrios Karles

VERIFIED
Business, Landlord-Tenant, Residential Real Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Collection

Dimitrios Karles is a member of the firm’s business, litigation, and real estate section. As a litigator, he regularly represents individual and cor... (more)

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Pamela  Herrington Lawyer

Pamela Herrington

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Custody & Visitation, Child Support, Alimony & Spousal Support, Adoption

Pamela Herrington is a native Richmonder specializing in family law and has extensive trial experience throughout the Commonwealth of Virginia. Much o... (more)

Allison  Bridges Lawyer

Allison Bridges

Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Criminal, Wills & Probate, Juvenile Law

Allison L. Bridges, Esq. practices in the areas of family law, including divorce, custody, and visitation, as well as criminal and traffic defense, an... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

804-358-8000

John G Mizell

Land Use & Zoning, Real Estate, Family Law, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Harris W. Leiner

Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Aimee S. Clanton

Farms, Family Law, Divorce, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Paula L Peaden

Family Law, Wills & Probate, Elder Law, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Glen Allen Divorce & Family Law Lawyers and Glen Allen Divorce & Family Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Divorce & Family Law practice areas such as Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce and Family Law matters.

LEGAL TERMS

NEXT OF KIN

The closest relatives, as defined by state law, of a deceased person. Most states recognize the spouse and the nearest blood relatives as next of kin.

ADOPT

(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative bo... (more...)
(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative body may adopt a law or an amendment, a government agency may adopt a regulation or a party to a lawsuit may adopt a particular argument.

BEST INTERESTS (OF THE CHILD)

The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best inter... (more...)
The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best interests of the child. Similarly, when asked to decide on custody issues in a divorce case, the judge will base his or her decision on the child's best interests. And the same test is used when judges decide whether a child should be removed from a parent's home because of neglect or abuse. Factors considered by the court in deciding the best interests of a child include: age and sex of the child mental and physical health of the child mental and physical health of the parents lifestyle and other social factors of the parents emotional ties between the parents and the child ability of the parents to provide the child with food, shelter, clothing and medical care established living pattern for the child concerning school, home, community and religious institution quality of schooling, and the child's preference.

DIVORCE

The legal termination of marriage. All states require a spouse to identify a legal reason for requesting a divorce when that spouse files the divorce papers wit... (more...)
The legal termination of marriage. All states require a spouse to identify a legal reason for requesting a divorce when that spouse files the divorce papers with the court. These reasons are referred to as grounds for a divorce.

GROUNDS FOR DIVORCE

Legal reasons for requesting a divorce. All states require a spouse who files for divorce to state the grounds, court and whether requesting a fault divorce or ... (more...)
Legal reasons for requesting a divorce. All states require a spouse who files for divorce to state the grounds, court and whether requesting a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce.

PATERNITY SUIT

A lawsuit to determine the identity of the father of a child born outside of marriage, and to provide for the support of the child once the identity of the fath... (more...)
A lawsuit to determine the identity of the father of a child born outside of marriage, and to provide for the support of the child once the identity of the father has been determined.

ACKNOWLEDGED FATHER

The biological father of a child born to an unmarried couple who has been established as the father either by his admission or by an agreement between him and t... (more...)
The biological father of a child born to an unmarried couple who has been established as the father either by his admission or by an agreement between him and the child's mother. An acknowledged father must pay child support.

COMPLAINT

Papers filed with a court clerk by the plaintiff to initiate a lawsuit by setting out facts and legal claims (usually called causes of action). In some states a... (more...)
Papers filed with a court clerk by the plaintiff to initiate a lawsuit by setting out facts and legal claims (usually called causes of action). In some states and in some types of legal actions, such as divorce, complaints are called petitions and the person filing is called the petitioner. To complete the initial stage of a lawsuit, the plaintiff's complaint must be served on the defendant, who then has the opportunity to respond by filing an answer. In practice, few lawyers prepare complaints from scratch. Instead they use -- and sometimes modify -- pre-drafted complaints widely available in form books.

POT TRUST

A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One impor... (more...)
A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One important advantage of a pot trust over separate trusts is that it allows the trustee to provide for one child's unforeseen need, such as a medical emergency. But a pot trust can also make the trustee's life difficult by requiring choices about disbursing funds to the various children. A pot trust ends when the youngest child reaches a certain age, usually 18 or 21.