Greenville Family Law Lawyer, South Carolina


Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Jamie DeMint

Family Law, Criminal, Personal Injury, Medical Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jefferson G. Wood

Criminal, Family Law, Insurance, Personal Injury, Products Liability
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Jonathan P. Whitehead

Real Estate, Litigation, Family Law, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Abel Orlando Gray

Domestic Violence & Neglect, White Collar Crime, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Alex R. Stalvey

Lawsuit & Dispute, Family Law, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Allison Michelle Rock

Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  7 Years

Allyson Sue Rucker

Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  18 Years

Allyson Sue Rucker

Estate Planning, Family Law, Criminal, Civil Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  18 Years

Amanda Morris Gallivan

Lawsuit & Dispute, Family Law, Child Support, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Amy Richmond Callaway

Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

MARITAL SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT

See divorce agreement.

PATERNITY SUIT

A lawsuit to determine the identity of the father of a child born outside of marriage, and to provide for the support of the child once the identity of the fath... (more...)
A lawsuit to determine the identity of the father of a child born outside of marriage, and to provide for the support of the child once the identity of the father has been determined.

COMPLAINT

Papers filed with a court clerk by the plaintiff to initiate a lawsuit by setting out facts and legal claims (usually called causes of action). In some states a... (more...)
Papers filed with a court clerk by the plaintiff to initiate a lawsuit by setting out facts and legal claims (usually called causes of action). In some states and in some types of legal actions, such as divorce, complaints are called petitions and the person filing is called the petitioner. To complete the initial stage of a lawsuit, the plaintiff's complaint must be served on the defendant, who then has the opportunity to respond by filing an answer. In practice, few lawyers prepare complaints from scratch. Instead they use -- and sometimes modify -- pre-drafted complaints widely available in form books.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.

OPEN ADOPTION

An adoption in which there is some degree of contact between the birthparents and the adoptive parents and sometimes with the child as well. As opposed to most ... (more...)
An adoption in which there is some degree of contact between the birthparents and the adoptive parents and sometimes with the child as well. As opposed to most adoptions in which birth and adoption records are sealed by court order, open adoptions allow the parties to decide how much contact the adoptive family and the birthparents will have.

RESPONDENT

A term used instead of defendant or appellee in some states -- especially for divorce and other family law cases -- to identify the party who is sued and must r... (more...)
A term used instead of defendant or appellee in some states -- especially for divorce and other family law cases -- to identify the party who is sued and must respond to the petitioner's complaint.

PROVOCATION

The act of inciting another person to do a particular thing. In a fault divorce, provocation may constitute a defense to the divorce, preventing it from going t... (more...)
The act of inciting another person to do a particular thing. In a fault divorce, provocation may constitute a defense to the divorce, preventing it from going through. For example, if a wife suing for divorce claims that her husband abandoned her, the husband might defend the suit on the grounds that she provoked the abandonment by driving him out of the house.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.

STEPCHILD

A child born to your spouse before your marriage whom you have not legally adopted. If you adopt the child, he or she is legally treated just like a biological ... (more...)
A child born to your spouse before your marriage whom you have not legally adopted. If you adopt the child, he or she is legally treated just like a biological offspring. Under the Uniform Probate Code, followed in some states, a stepchild belongs in the same class as a biological child and will inherit property left 'to my children.' In other states, a stepchild is not treated like a biological child unless he or she can prove that the parental relationship was established when he or she was a minor and that adoption would have occurred but for some legal obstacle.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Lewis v. Lewis

... Initially, the family courts operated with little statutory guidance and scarce case law. ... By my reading, the Court of Appeals reversed and remanded the case because it found the family court committed an error of law by automatically accepting the expert's opinion. ...

Semken v. Semken

... In this family law action, Catherine Semken (Wife) appeals the family court's order terminating Francis Semken's (Husband) obligation to pay Wife alimony, awarding Husband reimbursement alimony, and requiring Wife to pay Husband's attorney's fees and costs. ...

Feldman v. Feldman

... WILLIAMS J.: In this family law action, Donald Feldman (Husband) appeals the family court's decision not to terminate his obligation to pay Francine Feldman's (Wife) alimony. Wife appeals the family court's decision not to award her attorney's fees. ...