Hartsel Family Law Lawyer, Colorado


Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Catherine (Cathy) J. Cheroutes

Adoption, Child Support, Collaborative Law, Farms
Status:  In Good Standing           

Monica S. Mcelyea

Real Estate Other, Family Law, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  30 Years

Monica S. McElyea

Family Law, Divorce & Family Law, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  30 Years

Anne Parmley

Real Estate, Family Law, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years
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Anne Parmley

Real Estate, Family Law, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years

Maryjo Catherine Falcone

Defect and Lemon Law, Wills & Probate, Family Law, Bankruptcy, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  31 Years

Monica S. Mcelyea

Family Law, Divorce & Family Law, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  30 Years

Jeffrey Robert Burns

Real Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute, Family Law, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  39 Years

Jeffrey Robert Burns

Real Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute, Family Law, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  39 Years

Joanna K. Smith

Agriculture, Family Law, Elder Law, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  20 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

BEST INTERESTS (OF THE CHILD)

The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best inter... (more...)
The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best interests of the child. Similarly, when asked to decide on custody issues in a divorce case, the judge will base his or her decision on the child's best interests. And the same test is used when judges decide whether a child should be removed from a parent's home because of neglect or abuse. Factors considered by the court in deciding the best interests of a child include: age and sex of the child mental and physical health of the child mental and physical health of the parents lifestyle and other social factors of the parents emotional ties between the parents and the child ability of the parents to provide the child with food, shelter, clothing and medical care established living pattern for the child concerning school, home, community and religious institution quality of schooling, and the child's preference.

HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD

A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income ta... (more...)
A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income tax law, you are eligible for favorable tax treatment as the head of household only if you are unmarried and you manage a household which is the principal residence (for more than half of the year) of dependent children or other dependent relatives. Under bankruptcy homestead and exemption laws, the terms householder and 'head of household' mean the same thing. Examples include a single woman supporting her disabled sister and her own children or a bachelor supporting his parents. Many states consider a single person supporting only himself to be a head of household as well.

FAULT DIVORCE

A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorc... (more...)
A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorce from the 'guilty' spouse. Today, 35 states still allow a spouse to allege fault in obtaining a divorce. The traditional fault grounds for divorce are adultery, cruelty, desertion, confinement in prison, physical incapacity and incurable insanity. These grounds are also generally referred to as marital misconduct.

CONNIVANCE

A situation set up so that another person commits a wrongdoing. For example, a husband who invites his wife's lover along on vacation may have connived her adul... (more...)
A situation set up so that another person commits a wrongdoing. For example, a husband who invites his wife's lover along on vacation may have connived her adultery, and if he tried to divorce her for her behavior, she could assert his connivance as a defense.

ADOPT

(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative bo... (more...)
(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative body may adopt a law or an amendment, a government agency may adopt a regulation or a party to a lawsuit may adopt a particular argument.

GUARDIANSHIP

A legal relationship created by a court between a guardian and his ward--either a minor child or an incapacitated adult. The guardian has a legal right and duty... (more...)
A legal relationship created by a court between a guardian and his ward--either a minor child or an incapacitated adult. The guardian has a legal right and duty to care for the ward. This may involve making personal decisions on his or her behalf, managing property or both. Guardianships of incapacitated adults are more typically called conservatorships .

LEGAL CUSTODY

The right and obligation to make decisions about a child's upbringing, including schooling and medical care. Many states typically have both parents share legal... (more...)
The right and obligation to make decisions about a child's upbringing, including schooling and medical care. Many states typically have both parents share legal custody of a child. Compare physical custody.

DIVORCE AGREEMENT

An agreement made by a divorcing couple regarding the division of property, custody and visitation of the children, alimony or child support. The agreement must... (more...)
An agreement made by a divorcing couple regarding the division of property, custody and visitation of the children, alimony or child support. The agreement must be put in writing, signed by the parties and accepted by the court. It becomes part of the divorce decree and does away with the necessity of having a trial on the issues covered by the agreement. A divorce agreement may also be called a marital settlement agreement, marital termination agreement or settlement agreement.

ALIMONY

The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of lo... (more...)
The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of long duration (ten years or more) or in the case of an ailing spouse, alimony usually lasts for a set period, with the expectation that the recipient spouse will become self-supporting. Alimony is also called 'spousal support' or 'maintenance.'

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

McCallum Family LLC v. Winger

... Plaintiff, McCallum Family, LLC (McCallum), appeals the judgment, entered after a trial to the court, in favor of defendants, Marc Winger and Karen Winger. ... We agree. The proper burden of proof is a question of law which we review de novo. Microsemi Corp. ...

American Family Mut. Ins. Co. v. DeWitt

... claims in equity. Turning to the rights obtained by American Family through that subrogation, negligence is a cause of action at law, whether examining the historical roots of the concept or the remedies sought. As such, the court ...

Lewis v. Lewis

... The majority comes up with its "mutual purpose of the parties" cause of action by "[b]orrowing from ... diverse jurisprudence," including trust and family law. Maj. op. at 1143. Yet it ignores precedent precisely on point in the field of unjust enrichment. ...