Independence Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Missouri

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James R. Piedimonte Lawyer

James R. Piedimonte

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Paternity, Child Custody, Child Support

James Piedimonte is one of the most experienced family law attorneys in Jackson County with over 35 years experience in child custody and divorce lit... (more)

Mitzi J. Alspaugh Lawyer

Mitzi J. Alspaugh

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Power of Attorney, Traffic, Wills & Probate, Child Custody

Mitzi Alspaugh is a practicing lawyer in the state of Missouri specializing in Divorce & Family Law. Ms. Alspaugh received her J.D. from the Washburn ... (more)

Anne Virginia Kiske Lawyer

Anne Virginia Kiske

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Child Custody, Divorce, Estate
We offer services in family law, divorce, child custody, probate, estate planning and traffic

At the Kiske Law Office, LLC, I am responsible for child custody cases, child abuse cases, divorces, paternities, guardianships, and traffic matters, ... (more)

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David P Kimminau

Farms, Collaborative Law, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support
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R. Scott Richart

Other, Family Law, Juvenile Law, Criminal
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John W. Dennis

Farms, Family Law, Alimony & Spousal Support, Divorce
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Michael S.J. Albano

Family Law, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Paul E. Evans

Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Wills & Probate, Mass Torts
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Ted Kapke

Business Organization, Family Law, Eminent Domain, Collection
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Robert D Murphy

Business Organization, Criminal, Estate Planning, Family Law
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LEGAL TERMS

DISSOLUTION

A term used instead of divorce in some states.

ADOPT

(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative bo... (more...)
(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative body may adopt a law or an amendment, a government agency may adopt a regulation or a party to a lawsuit may adopt a particular argument.

GUARDIAN OF THE ESTATE

Someone appointed by a court to care for the property of a minor child that is not supervised by an adult under some other legal method, such as a trust. A guar... (more...)
Someone appointed by a court to care for the property of a minor child that is not supervised by an adult under some other legal method, such as a trust. A guardian of the estate may also be called a 'property guardian' or 'financial guardian.' See also guardian.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.

FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT (FMLA)

A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family hea... (more...)
A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family health needs or personal illness. The employer must allow the employee to return to the same position or a position similar to that held before taking the leave. There are exceptions to the FMLA: the most notable is that only employers with 50 or more employees are covered--about half the workforce.

COMPARABLE RECTITUDE

A doctrine that grants the spouse least at fault a divorce when both spouses have shown grounds for divorce. It is a response to an old common-law rule that pre... (more...)
A doctrine that grants the spouse least at fault a divorce when both spouses have shown grounds for divorce. It is a response to an old common-law rule that prevented a divorce when both spouses were at fault.

RESPONDENT

A term used instead of defendant or appellee in some states -- especially for divorce and other family law cases -- to identify the party who is sued and must r... (more...)
A term used instead of defendant or appellee in some states -- especially for divorce and other family law cases -- to identify the party who is sued and must respond to the petitioner's complaint.

INCURABLE INSANITY

A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of... (more...)
A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of the spouse being divorced and that the insanity is incurable.

ALIMONY

The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of lo... (more...)
The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of long duration (ten years or more) or in the case of an ailing spouse, alimony usually lasts for a set period, with the expectation that the recipient spouse will become self-supporting. Alimony is also called 'spousal support' or 'maintenance.'