Jeffersonville Estate Planning Lawyer, Indiana


Includes: Gift Taxation

Lee Pettay

Social Security -- Disability, Estate Planning, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Matthew Wilder Lorch

Real Estate, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  17 Years

Robert P. Hamilton

Real Estate, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  37 Years

George A. Streib

Family Law, Wills & Probate, Child Support, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years
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Timothy J. Naville

Wills & Probate, Trusts, Estate Planning, Elder Law
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  30 Years

Keith Pulliam

Wills & Probate, Business, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

E Gerry Barker

Estate Planning, Business & Trade, Litigation, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Easily find Jeffersonville Estate Planning Lawyers and Jeffersonville Estate Planning Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Estate areas including Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

TAKING AGAINST THE WILL

A procedure under state law that gives a surviving spouse the right to demand a certain share (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's property.... (more...)
A procedure under state law that gives a surviving spouse the right to demand a certain share (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's property. The surviving spouse can take that share instead of accepting whatever he or she inherited through the deceased spouse's will. If the surviving spouse decides to take the statutory share, it's called 'taking against the will.' Dower and curtesy is another name for the same legal process.

LIVING TRUST

A trust you can set up during your life. Living trusts are an excellent way to avoid the cost and hassle of probate because the property you transfer into the t... (more...)
A trust you can set up during your life. Living trusts are an excellent way to avoid the cost and hassle of probate because the property you transfer into the trust during your life passes directly to the trust beneficiaries after you die, without court involvement. The successor trustee--the person you appoint to handle the trust after your death--simply transfers ownership to the beneficiaries you named in the trust. Living trusts are also called 'inter vivos trusts.'

HEIR AT LAW

A person entitled to inherit property under intestate succession laws.

BEQUEATH

A legal term sometimes used in wills that means 'leave' -- for example, 'I bequeath my garden tools to my brother-in-law, Buster Jenkins.'

LETTERS TESTAMENTARY

The document given to an executor by the probate court, authorizing the executor to settle the estate according to either a will or the state's intestate succes... (more...)
The document given to an executor by the probate court, authorizing the executor to settle the estate according to either a will or the state's intestate succession laws.

ADEMPTION

The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she di... (more...)
The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she dies. Often this happens because the property has been sold, destroyed or given away to someone other than the beneficiary named in the will. A bequest may also be adeemed when the will maker, while still living, gives the property to the intended beneficiary (called 'ademption by satisfaction'). When a bequest is adeemed, the beneficiary named in the will is out of luck; he or she doesn't get cash or a different item of property to replace the one that was described in the will. For example, Mark writes in his will, 'I leave to Rob the family vehicle,' but then trades in his car in for a jet ski. When Mark dies, Rob will receive nothing. Frustrated beneficiaries may challenge an ademption in court, especially if the property was not clearly identified in the first place.

PROVING A WILL

Convincing a probate court that a document is truly the deceased person's will. Usually this is a simple formality that the executor or administrator easily sat... (more...)
Convincing a probate court that a document is truly the deceased person's will. Usually this is a simple formality that the executor or administrator easily satisfies by showing that the will was signed and dated by the deceased person in front of two or more witnesses. When the will is holographic -- that is, completely handwritten by the deceased and not witnessed, it is still valid in many states if the executor can produce relatives and friends to testify that the handwriting is that of the deceased.

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR

Someone appointed by a probate court to oversee probate proceedings when a person dies without a will or heirs, and his or her property is expected to pass to t... (more...)
Someone appointed by a probate court to oversee probate proceedings when a person dies without a will or heirs, and his or her property is expected to pass to the state. Some states have public administrators who are responsible for temporarily preserving the assets of an estate if there are disputes about specific provisions in the will or about who will be appointed the regular administrator.

LAPSE

Under a will, the failure of a gift of property. A gift lapses when the beneficiary dies before the person who made the will, and no alternate has been named. S... (more...)
Under a will, the failure of a gift of property. A gift lapses when the beneficiary dies before the person who made the will, and no alternate has been named. Some states have anti-lapse statutes, which prevent gifts to relatives of the deceased person from lapsing unless the relative has no heirs of his or her own. A lapsed gift becomes part of the residuary estate.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

First Farmers Bank & Trust Co. v. Whorley

... We are not persuaded. Indiana Code section 29-3-9-4, referred to by our supreme court as Indiana's guardianship estate planning statute, provides. (a) Upon petition of the guardian (other than a temporary guardian) or any ...

In re Guardianship of Phillips

... On May 19, 2009, Hudson filed a petition to do estate planning on Donna's behalf and revoke the Joint Trust. ... Id. at 8. In its judgment, the trial court denied Hudson's petition to do estate planning and revoke the Joint Trust and declared the Joint Trust shall remain in effect. ...

Leever v. Leever

... fraud. Title 42 of the United States Code section 1396(a) expresses the legislative intent that the Medicaid program should not be used as an estate planning tool. Forsyth v. Rowe, 226 Conn. 818, 828, 629 A.2d 379, (1993). ...