Kalamazoo Family Law Lawyer, Michigan

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Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Shaun P. Willis Lawyer

Shaun P. Willis

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Accident & Injury, Real Estate, Criminal, Family Law, Estate

Shaun Willis, along with his brother Michael, is a co-founder and Partner of Willis & Willis, PLC. Willis & Willis, PLC has offices in Kalamazoo, Gran... (more)

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Sidney D. Durham

Family Law, Divorce, Farms, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

Leslie L. Payseno

Farms, Family Law, Divorce, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

Peter A. D'Angelo

Criminal, Child Support, Divorce, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Alicia Katherine Storm

Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Estate Planning, Trusts, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  8 Years

Jennifer Lynn Grahek

Federal Appellate Practice, Trusts, Family Law, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

Alesha Burnash

Juvenile Law, Family Law, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Saraphoena Boudrie Koffron

Litigation, Federal Appellate Practice, Family Law, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

Alesha Leslie Burnash

Juvenile Law, Traffic, Family Law, White Collar Crime
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  12 Years

Alesha Leslie Burnash

Juvenile Law, Family Law, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

VISITATION RIGHTS

The right to see a child regularly, typically awarded by the court to the parent who does not have physical custody of the child. The court will deny visitation... (more...)
The right to see a child regularly, typically awarded by the court to the parent who does not have physical custody of the child. The court will deny visitation rights only if it decides that visitation would hurt the child so much that the parent should be kept away.

CRUELTY

Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practi... (more...)
Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practical matter, courts will accept minor wrongs or disagreements as sufficient evidence of cruelty to justify the divorce.

STEPCHILD

A child born to your spouse before your marriage whom you have not legally adopted. If you adopt the child, he or she is legally treated just like a biological ... (more...)
A child born to your spouse before your marriage whom you have not legally adopted. If you adopt the child, he or she is legally treated just like a biological offspring. Under the Uniform Probate Code, followed in some states, a stepchild belongs in the same class as a biological child and will inherit property left 'to my children.' In other states, a stepchild is not treated like a biological child unless he or she can prove that the parental relationship was established when he or she was a minor and that adoption would have occurred but for some legal obstacle.

ADULTERY

Consensual sexual relations by a married person with someone other than his or her spouse. In many states, adultery is technically a crime, though people are ra... (more...)
Consensual sexual relations by a married person with someone other than his or her spouse. In many states, adultery is technically a crime, though people are rarely prosecuted for it. In states that have retained fault grounds for divorce, adultery is always sufficient grounds for a divorce. In addition, some states alter the distribution of property between divorcing spouses in cases of adultery, giving less to the 'cheating' spouse.

ACKNOWLEDGED FATHER

The biological father of a child born to an unmarried couple who has been established as the father either by his admission or by an agreement between him and t... (more...)
The biological father of a child born to an unmarried couple who has been established as the father either by his admission or by an agreement between him and the child's mother. An acknowledged father must pay child support.

BRIEF

A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she shoul... (more...)
A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she should prevail. These arguments must be supported by legal authority and precedent, such as statutes, regulations and previous court decisions. Although it is usually possible to submit a brief to a trial court (called a trial brief), briefs are most commonly used as a central part of the appeal process (an appellate brief). But don't be fooled by the name -- briefs are usually anything but brief, as pointed out by writer Franz Kafka, who defined a lawyer as 'a person who writes a 10,000 word decision and calls it a brief.'

CUSTODIAL INTERFERENCE

The taking of a child from his or her parent with the intent to interfere with that parent's physical custody of the child. This is a crime in most states, even... (more...)
The taking of a child from his or her parent with the intent to interfere with that parent's physical custody of the child. This is a crime in most states, even if the taker also has custody rights.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge ... (more...)
An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge on her own (sua sponte). For example, in a divorce, at the request of one parent a judge might issue an order directing the other parent to appear in court on a particular date and time to show cause why the first parent should not be given sole physical custody of the children. Although it would seem that the person receiving an order to show cause is at a procedural disadvantage--she, after all, is the one who is told to come up with a convincing reason why the judge shouldn't order something--both sides normally have an equal chance to convince the judge to rule in their favor.

SPOUSAL SUPPORT

See alimony.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Johnson Family Ltd. Partnership v. White Pine Wireless, LLC

... At the time, the Johnson Family Trust (the Trust) served as the general partner for the Partnership. ... 480, 482, 722 NW2d 906 (2006). Whether a grant of equitable relief is proper under a given set of facts is a question of law that this Court also reviews de novo. ...

Estes v. Titus

... Toth), Kalamazoo, for Julie L. Swabash. Speaker Law Firm, PLLC (by Liisa R. Speaker and Jodi M. Latuszek), Lansing, for amici curiae the Family Law Section of the State Bar of Michigan. Howard & Howard Attorneys, PC (by ...

Sinicropi v. Mazurek

... 232, 241, 86 NW2d 336 (1957). Here, the trial court drew on virtually all the traditional equitable principles applicable in family-law cases: the best interest of the child, the fitness of the competing parents, and the past relationships of the parties. ...