Kansas City RICO Act Lawyer, Missouri


Mitzi J. Alspaugh Lawyer

Mitzi J. Alspaugh

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Immigration, Criminal, Veterans' Affairs

Mitzi Alspaugh is a practicing lawyer in the state of Missouri specializing in Divorce & Family Law. Ms. Alspaugh received her J.D. from the Washburn ... (more)

Andrea M. Welch Lawyer

Andrea M. Welch

VERIFIED
Criminal, Motor Vehicle, DUI-DWI, US Courts, Felony

Andrea Welch is the President of the Eastern Jackson County Bar Association (board member since 2001, member since 1999). She is also the President of... (more)

James R. Hobbs

Criminal, Corporate, Licensing, Antitrust
Status:  In Good Standing           

Charles M. Rogers

Grand Jury Proceedings, Federal, Felony, Criminal
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Denise Kirby

Criminal, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

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J. Russell Ford

Child Support, Contract, Farms, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Keith E. Drill

Litigation, Workers' Compensation, Criminal, Corporate, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Christie Sherman Jess

Criminal, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Larry S. Buccero

Alimony & Spousal Support, Criminal, Child Support, Children's Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           

Chad E. O'Neill

Litigation, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

IMPRISON

To put a person in prison or jail or otherwise confine him as punishment for committing a crime.

PROSECUTOR

A lawyer who works for the local, state or federal government to bring and litigate criminal cases.

EAVESDROPPING

Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or bi... (more...)
Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or binoculars. The term comes from the common law offense of listening to private conversations by crouching under the windows or eaves of a house. Nowadays, eavesdropping includes using electronic equipment to intercept telephone or other wire communications, or radio equipment to intercept broadcast communications. Generally, the term 'eavesdropping' is used when the activity is not legally authorized by a search warrant or court order; and the term 'surveillance' is used when the activity is permitted by law. Compare electronic surveillance.

ACCESSORY

Someone who intentionally helps another person commit a felony by giving advice before the crime or helping to conceal the evidence or the perpetrator. An acces... (more...)
Someone who intentionally helps another person commit a felony by giving advice before the crime or helping to conceal the evidence or the perpetrator. An accessory is usually not physically present during the crime. For example, hiding a robber who is being sought by the police might make you an 'accessory after the fact' to a robbery. Compare accomplice.

ARREST WARRANT

A document issued by a judge or magistrate that authorizes the police to arrest someone. Warrants are issued when law enforcement personnel present evidence to ... (more...)
A document issued by a judge or magistrate that authorizes the police to arrest someone. Warrants are issued when law enforcement personnel present evidence to the judge or magistrate that convinces her that it is reasonably likely that a crime has taken place and that the person to be named in the warrant is criminally responsible for that crime.

CONSTABLE

A peace officer for a particular geographic area -- most often a rural county -- who commonly has the power to serve legal papers, arrest lawbreakers and keep t... (more...)
A peace officer for a particular geographic area -- most often a rural county -- who commonly has the power to serve legal papers, arrest lawbreakers and keep the peace. Depending on the state, a constable may be similar to a marshal or sheriff.

BAIL BOND

The money posted by a 'bondsman' for a defendant who cannot afford his bail. The defendant pays a certain portion, usually 10%. If the defendant fails to appear... (more...)
The money posted by a 'bondsman' for a defendant who cannot afford his bail. The defendant pays a certain portion, usually 10%. If the defendant fails to appear for a court hearing, the judge can issue a warrant for his arrest and threaten to 'forfeit,' or keep, the money if the defendant doesn't appear soon. Usually, the bondsman will look for the defendant and bring him back, forcefully if necessary, in order to avoid losing the bail money.

CRIMINAL CASE

A lawsuit brought by a prosecutor employed by the federal, state or local government that charges a person with the commission of a crime.

DIRECTED VERDICT

A ruling by a judge, typically made after the plaintiff has presented all of her evidence but before the defendant puts on his case, that awards judgment to the... (more...)
A ruling by a judge, typically made after the plaintiff has presented all of her evidence but before the defendant puts on his case, that awards judgment to the defendant. A directed verdict is usually made because the judge concludes the plaintiff has failed to offer the minimum amount of evidence to prove her case even if there were no opposition. In other words, the judge is saying that, as a matter of law, no reasonable jury could decide in the plaintiff's favor. In a criminal case, a directed verdict is a judgement of acquittal for the defendant.