Little Rock Felony Lawyer, Arkansas

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Matthew Porter McKay Lawyer

Matthew Porter McKay

VERIFIED
Criminal, Felony, Misdemeanor
I defend the accused, innocent, or guilty. I handle felony and misdemeanor cases.

Like many of my clients, I was born and raised in Arkansas by a single mother. I went to high school, college and law school in Little Rock. While in ... (more)

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800-658-4570

Pamela  Panasiuk Lawyer

Pamela Panasiuk

VERIFIED
Criminal, Accident & Injury, Social Security -- Disability, Traffic

Pamela Epperson Panasiuk provides aggressive, thorough and personalized representation to individuals accused of crimes. She will protect an accuser's... (more)

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CONTACT

800-736-4460

Robert Alston Newcomb Lawyer

Robert Alston Newcomb

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Employment

Mr. Newcomb proudly represents clients in need of Criminal and Employment matters.

Judson Candler Kidd Lawyer

Judson Candler Kidd

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law

I was exposed to law at an early age as my grandfather and father were trial lawyers, grandmother was a court reporter and my uncle was a US Marshall.... (more)

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800-936-8091

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William Price Feland Lawyer

William Price Feland

VERIFIED
Criminal, Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law

William Price Feland is a practicing lawyer in the state of Arkansas.

Valerie Lynne Goudie Lawyer

Valerie Lynne Goudie

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Accident & Injury, Estate, Civil & Human Rights

Valerie Palmedo-Goudie graduated from Auburn University in 1986 where she earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree. She graduated from Washington and Lee Scho... (more)

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CONTACT

800-789-2281

Lisa Gail Douglas Lawyer

Lisa Gail Douglas

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Health Care, Social Security, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law
Focus of practice is injury, accidents and social security disability.

Talk to a Nurse/Attorney. Voted Best Attorney 4 consecutive years in the Stephens Media NLR Times Poll. Lisa Douglas has been licensed as a Register... (more)

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CONTACT

501-798-0004

Christopher M. Nolen

DUI-DWI, Traffic, Criminal, White Collar Crime
Status:  In Good Standing           

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David W. Kamps

Criminal, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Laura Robertson

Farms, Child Support, Adoption, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

MCNAGHTEN RULE

The earliest and most common test for criminal insanity, in which a criminal defendant is judged legally insane only if he could not distinguish right from wron... (more...)
The earliest and most common test for criminal insanity, in which a criminal defendant is judged legally insane only if he could not distinguish right from wrong at the time he committed the crime. For example, a delusional psychotic who believed that his assaultive acts were in response to the will of God would not be criminally responsible for his acts.

ELEMENTS (OF A CRIME)

The component parts of crimes. For example, 'Robbery' is defined as the taking and carrying away of property of another by force or fear with the intent to perm... (more...)
The component parts of crimes. For example, 'Robbery' is defined as the taking and carrying away of property of another by force or fear with the intent to permanently deprive the owner of the property. Each of those four parts is an element that the prosecution must prove beyond a reasonable doubt.

CAPITAL CASE

A prosecution for murder in which the jury is also asked to decide if the defendant is guilty and, if he is, whether he should be put to death. When a prosecuto... (more...)
A prosecution for murder in which the jury is also asked to decide if the defendant is guilty and, if he is, whether he should be put to death. When a prosecutor brings a capital case (also called a death penalty case), she must charge one or more 'special circumstances' that the jury must find to be true in order to sentence the defendant to death. Each state (and the federal government) has its own list of special circumstances, but common ones include multiple murders, use of a bomb or a finding that the murder was especially heinous, atrocious or cruel.

JUSTICE SYSTEM

A term lawyers use to describe the courts and other bureaucracies that handle American's criminal legal business, including offices of various state and federal... (more...)
A term lawyers use to describe the courts and other bureaucracies that handle American's criminal legal business, including offices of various state and federal prosecutors and public defenders. Many people caught up in this system refer to it by less flattering names.

ACCOMPLICE

Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An ... (more...)
Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An accomplice is guilty of the same offense and usually receives the same sentence as the principal. For instance, the driver of the getaway car for a burglary is an accomplice and will be guilty of the burglary even though he may not have entered the building.

CORPUS DELECTI

Latin for the 'body of the crime.' Used to describe physical evidence, such as the corpse of a murder victim or the charred frame of a torched building.

INFORMED CONSENT

An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available al... (more...)
An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available alternatives. For example, a patient may give informed consent to medical treatment only after the healthcare professional has disclosed all possible risks involved in accepting or rejecting the treatment. A healthcare provider or facility may be held responsible for an injury caused by an undisclosed risk. In another context, a person accused of committing a crime cannot give up his constitutional rights--for example, to remain silent or to talk with an attorney--unless and until he has been informed of those rights, usually via the well-known Miranda warnings.

SPECIFIC INTENT

An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of ... (more...)
An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of larceny is the taking of the personal property of another with the intent to permanently deprive the other person of the property. A person is not guilty of larceny just because he took someone else's property; it must be proven that he took it with the purpose of keeping it permanently.

BATTERY

A crime consisting of physical contact that is intended to harm someone. Unintentional harmful contact is not battery, no mater how careless the behavior or how... (more...)
A crime consisting of physical contact that is intended to harm someone. Unintentional harmful contact is not battery, no mater how careless the behavior or how severe the injury. A fist fight is a common battery; being hit by a wild pitch in a baseball game is not.