Milledgeville Family Law Lawyer, Ohio


Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Dallas Brent Marshall

Estate, Family Law, Criminal, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  23 Years

Jess Carter Weade

Real Estate, Agriculture, Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

John Hirst Wead

Family Law, Elder Law, Collection, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  44 Years

Victor Dwight Pontious

Corporate, Bankruptcy, Workers' Compensation, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  41 Years
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John Mitchell Scott

Juvenile Law, Federal Appellate Practice, Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  25 Years

David Bryan Bender

Federal Appellate Practice, Family Law, Criminal, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  34 Years

Andrea Marie Ostgaard

Juvenile Law, Litigation, Government, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  17 Years

Susan Rae Wollscheid

Juvenile Law, Real Estate, Federal Appellate Practice, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  10 Years

Melissa S Upthegrove

Workers' Compensation, Family Law, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

Chaley Peelle Griffith

Estate Planning, Estate, Family Law, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  16 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

ANNULMENT

A court procedure that dissolves a marriage and treats it as if it never happened. Annulments are rare since the advent of no-fault divorce but may be obtained ... (more...)
A court procedure that dissolves a marriage and treats it as if it never happened. Annulments are rare since the advent of no-fault divorce but may be obtained in most states for one of the following reasons: misrepresentation, concealment (for example, of an addiction or criminal record), misunderstanding and refusal to consummate the marriage.

PROVOCATION

The act of inciting another person to do a particular thing. In a fault divorce, provocation may constitute a defense to the divorce, preventing it from going t... (more...)
The act of inciting another person to do a particular thing. In a fault divorce, provocation may constitute a defense to the divorce, preventing it from going through. For example, if a wife suing for divorce claims that her husband abandoned her, the husband might defend the suit on the grounds that she provoked the abandonment by driving him out of the house.

FOSTER CARE

Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents h... (more...)
Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents have a legal responsibility to care for their foster children, but do not have all the rights of a biological parent--for example, they may have limited rights to discipline the children, to raise them according to a certain religion or to authorize non-emergency medical procedures for them. The foster parents do not become the child's legal parents unless the biological parents' rights are terminated by a court and the foster parents adopt the child. This is not typically encouraged, as the goal of foster care is to provide temporary support for the children until they can be returned to their parents. See also foster child.

CHILD SUPPORT

The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by e... (more...)
The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by entry into the armed forces or by living independently. Many states also impose child support obligations on parents for a year or two beyond this point if the child is a full-time student. If the parents are living separately, they each must still support the children. Typically, the parent who has custody meets his or her support obligation through taking care of the child every day, while the other parent must make payments to the custodial parent on behalf of the child -- usually cash but sometimes other kinds of contributions. When parents divorce, the court almost always orders the non-custodial parent to pay the custodial parent an amount of child support fixed by state law. Sometimes, however, if the parents share physical custody more or less equally, the court will order the higher-income parent to make payments to the lower-income parent.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.

MARITAL SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT

See divorce agreement.

COMMUNITY PROPERTY

A method for defining the ownership of property acquired during marriage, in which all earnings during marriage and all property acquired with those earnings ar... (more...)
A method for defining the ownership of property acquired during marriage, in which all earnings during marriage and all property acquired with those earnings are considered community property and all debts incurred during marriage are community property debts. Community property laws exist in Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin. Compare equitable distribution and separate property.

PATERNITY SUIT

A lawsuit to determine the identity of the father of a child born outside of marriage, and to provide for the support of the child once the identity of the fath... (more...)
A lawsuit to determine the identity of the father of a child born outside of marriage, and to provide for the support of the child once the identity of the father has been determined.

AMICUS CURIAE

Latin for 'friend of the court.' This term describes a person or organization that is not a party to a lawsuit as plaintiff or defendant but that has a strong i... (more...)
Latin for 'friend of the court.' This term describes a person or organization that is not a party to a lawsuit as plaintiff or defendant but that has a strong interest in the case and wants to get its two cents in. For example, the ACLU often submits materials to support a person who claims a violation of civil rights even though that person is represented by a lawyer.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Rankin v. Cuyahoga County Department of Children & Family Services

... {¶ 7} The first question presented by appellants concerns the liability of the Cuyahoga County Department of Children and Family Services. The court of appeals concluded that the common-law special-relationship exception to a political subdivision's immunity granted pursuant ...

Medcorp, Inc. v. Ohio Dept. of Job & Family Servs.

... 119.12 and 5111.06 of the Ohio Revised Code, Medcorp, Inc., by and through counsel, hereby appeals from the Adjudication Order issued by the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services dated April 19, 2006 * * *. The Adjudication Order is not in accordance with law and is ...

Mandelbaum v. Mandelbaum

... No. 3473, 1985 WL 10206; Fowler v. Fowler (June 27, 1980), Fairfield App. No. 10-CA-80; 1980 Ohio App. LEXIS 13588; 18 Ohio Jurisprudence (1972) 594, Divorce and Separation, Section 272; 1 Anderson's Ohio Family Law (1975), Section 27.9. ...