Mokane Estate Lawyer, Missouri, page 2


Dereama Karen Digh Allen

Dispute Resolution, Estate Planning, Adoption, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Matthew Joseph Frawley

International Tax, Family Law, Power of Attorney, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  5 Years

Beverly Jean Figg

Estate Planning, Workers' Compensation, Elder Law, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           

Scott Thomas Evans

Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Traffic, Estate, Administrative Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  10 Years

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT
Speak with Lawyer.com

Christina Rhea Neff

Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Power of Attorney, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Scott Dee Evans

Real Estate, Federal Appellate Practice, Estate, Administrative Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  10 Years

Amie Michelle Coleman

Power of Attorney, Landlord-Tenant, Estate Planning, Administrative Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  6 Years

Dean L. Cooper

Administrative Law, Estate Planning, Public Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Danelle Kaye Cord

Divorce & Family Law, Elder Law, Estate Planning, Power of Attorney
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jessi Erin Musick

Car Accident, Elder Law, Adoption, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  10 Years

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-620-0900

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.


Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

TIPS

Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Mokane Estate Lawyers and Mokane Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

ENTITY

An organization, institution or being that has its own existence for legal or tax purposes. An entity is often an organization with an existence separate from i... (more...)
An organization, institution or being that has its own existence for legal or tax purposes. An entity is often an organization with an existence separate from its individual members--for example, a corporation, partnership, trust, estate or government agency. The entity is treated like a person; it can function legally, be sued, and make decisions through agents.

DISINHERIT

To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit prope... (more...)
To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit property -- a close family member, for example -- should not receive it. In most states, you cannot completely disinherit your spouse; a surviving spouse has the right to claim a portion (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's estate. With a few exceptions, however, you can expressly disinherit children.

INHERITANCE TAXES

Taxes some states impose on people or organizations who inherit property from a deceased person's estate. The taxes are based on the value of the inherited prop... (more...)
Taxes some states impose on people or organizations who inherit property from a deceased person's estate. The taxes are based on the value of the inherited property.

OFFICER

A person elected by a profit or nonprofit corporation's board of directors, or by the manager of a limited liability company, to manage the day-to-day operation... (more...)
A person elected by a profit or nonprofit corporation's board of directors, or by the manager of a limited liability company, to manage the day-to-day operations of the organization. Officers generally hold titles such as President or Treasurer. Many states and most corporate bylaws or LLC operating agreements require a corporation or LLC to have a president, secretary and treasurer. Election of a vice president may be required by state law.

PROBATE

The court process following a person's death that includes proving the authenticity of the deceased person's will appointing someone to handle the deceased pers... (more...)
The court process following a person's death that includes proving the authenticity of the deceased person's will appointing someone to handle the deceased person's affairs identifying and inventorying the deceased person's property paying debts and taxes identifying heirs, and distributing the deceased person's property according to the will or, if there is no will, according to state law. Formal court-supervised probate is a costly, time-consuming process -- a windfall for lawyers -- which is best avoided if possible.

WARRANTY DEED

A seldom-used type of deed that contains express assurances about the legal validity of the title being transferred.

SURROGATE COURT

See probate court.

SPRINKLING TRUST

A trust that gives the person managing it (the trustee) the discretion to disburse its funds among the beneficiaries in any way he or she sees fit.

SELF-PROVING WILL

A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-prov... (more...)
A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-proving when two witnesses sign under penalty of perjury that they observed the willmaker sign it and that he told them it was his will. If no one contests the validity of the will, the probate court will accept the will without hearing the testimony of the witnesses or other evidence. To make a self-proving will in other states, the willmaker and one or more witnesses must sign an affidavit (sworn statement) before a notary public certifying that the will is genuine and that all willmaking formalities have been observed.