Morley Felony Lawyer, Missouri


Diane C. Howard

Education, Employment, Family Law, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

Patrick McMenamin

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  26 Years

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Boyd Andrew Green

Workers' Compensation, Social Security, Car Accident, Criminal, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  25 Years

Brandon Alan Cooper

Personal Injury, Juvenile Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Bryan Douglas Greaser

Traffic, Motor Vehicle, Criminal, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Clifton Kent Verhines Jr.

Criminal, Social Security, Workers' Compensation, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  19 Years

Curtis O. Poore

Litigation, Criminal, Wrongful Death, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

David S. Limbaugh

Entertainment, Estate Planning, DUI-DWI, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Deidre D. Jewel

Employment, Criminal, Traffic, Workers' Compensation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Gordon L. Glaus

Divorce, Divorce & Family Law, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

BAILOR

Someone who delivers an item of personal property to another person for a specific purpose. For example, a person who leaves a broken VCR with a repairman in or... (more...)
Someone who delivers an item of personal property to another person for a specific purpose. For example, a person who leaves a broken VCR with a repairman in order to get it fixed would be a bailor.

SELF-DEFENSE

An affirmative defense to a crime. Self-defense is the use of reasonable force to protect oneself from an aggressor. Self-defense shields a person from criminal... (more...)
An affirmative defense to a crime. Self-defense is the use of reasonable force to protect oneself from an aggressor. Self-defense shields a person from criminal liability for the harm inflicted on the aggressor. For example, a robbery victim who takes the robber's weapon and uses it against the robber during a struggle won't be liable for assault and battery since he can show that his action was reasonably necessary to protect himself from imminent harm.

DECLARATION UNDER PENALTY OF PERJURY

A signed statement, sworn to be true by the signer, that will make the signer guilty of the crime of perjury if the statement is shown to be materially false --... (more...)
A signed statement, sworn to be true by the signer, that will make the signer guilty of the crime of perjury if the statement is shown to be materially false -- that is, the lie is relevant and significant to the case.

NOLLE PROSEQUI

Latin for 'we shall no longer prosecute.' At trial, this is an entry made on the record by a prosecutor in a criminal case stating that he will no longer pursue... (more...)
Latin for 'we shall no longer prosecute.' At trial, this is an entry made on the record by a prosecutor in a criminal case stating that he will no longer pursue the matter. An entry of nolle prosequi may be made at any time after charges are brought and before a verdict is returned or a plea entered. Essentially, it is an admission on the part of the prosecution that some aspect of its case against the defendant has fallen apart. Most of the time, prosecutors need a judge's A1:C576 to 'nol-pros' a case. (See Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 48a.) Abbreviated 'nol. pros.' or 'nol-pros.'

INFORMED CONSENT

An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available al... (more...)
An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available alternatives. For example, a patient may give informed consent to medical treatment only after the healthcare professional has disclosed all possible risks involved in accepting or rejecting the treatment. A healthcare provider or facility may be held responsible for an injury caused by an undisclosed risk. In another context, a person accused of committing a crime cannot give up his constitutional rights--for example, to remain silent or to talk with an attorney--unless and until he has been informed of those rights, usually via the well-known Miranda warnings.

CONVICTION

A finding by a judge or jury that the defendant is guilty of a crime.

JURY NULLIFICATION

A decision by the jury to acquit a defendant who has violated a law that the jury believes is unjust or wrong. Jury nullification has always been an option for ... (more...)
A decision by the jury to acquit a defendant who has violated a law that the jury believes is unjust or wrong. Jury nullification has always been an option for juries in England and the United States, although judges will prevent a defense lawyer from urging the jury to acquit on this basis. Nullification was evident during the Vietnam war (when selective service protesters were acquitted by juries opposed to the war) and currently appears in criminal cases when the jury disagrees with the punishment--for example, in 'three strikes' cases when the jury realizes that conviction of a relatively minor offense will result in lifetime imprisonment.

CRIMINAL INSANITY

A mental defect or disease that makes it impossible for a person to understand the wrongfulness of his acts or, even if he understands them, to ditinguish right... (more...)
A mental defect or disease that makes it impossible for a person to understand the wrongfulness of his acts or, even if he understands them, to ditinguish right from wrong. Defendants who are criminally insane cannot be convicted of a crime, since criminal conduct involves the conscious intent to do wrong -- a choice that the criminally insane cannot meaningfully make. See also irresistible impulse; McNaghten Rule.

CORPUS DELECTI

Latin for the 'body of the crime.' Used to describe physical evidence, such as the corpse of a murder victim or the charred frame of a torched building.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Turner v. State

... Atty. Gen., Richard A. Starnes, Asst. Atty. Gen., for respondent. STEPHEN N. LIMBAUGH, JR., Judge. Reginald Turner appeals the denial of his Rule 24.035 motion for post-conviction relief after his plea of guilty to the class D felony of driving while intoxicated. ...

Melton v. State

... Movant was charged with one count of the Class A felony of second-degree drug trafficking in violation of Section 195.223 [2] and two counts of the class D felony of possessing ephedrine with intent to manufacture methamphetamine in violation of Section 195.246. ...

State v. Moore

... PATRICIA BRECKENRIDGE, Judge. Following the revocation of Michael Moore's probation in two separate criminal cases, the sentencing judge ordered execution of Mr. Moore's previously imposed sentences for felony driving while intoxicated. ...