New Hartford Trusts Lawyer, Iowa


Eric R. Miller

Tax, Real Estate, Corporate, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  57 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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800-943-8690

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By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

HEIR APPARENT

One who expects to be receive property from the estate of a family member, as long as she outlives that person.

CONTINGENT BENEFICIARY

1) An alternate beneficiary named in a will, trust or other document. 2) Any person entitled to property under a will if one or more prior conditions are satisf... (more...)
1) An alternate beneficiary named in a will, trust or other document. 2) Any person entitled to property under a will if one or more prior conditions are satisfied. For example, if Fred is entitled to take property under a will only if he's married at the time of the will maker's death, Fred is a contingent beneficiary. Similarly, if Ellen is named to receive a house only in the event her mother, who has been named to live in the house, moves out of it, Ellen is a contingent beneficiary.

FAILURE OF ISSUE

A situation in which a person dies without children who could have inherited her property.

DISINHERIT

To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit prope... (more...)
To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit property -- a close family member, for example -- should not receive it. In most states, you cannot completely disinherit your spouse; a surviving spouse has the right to claim a portion (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's estate. With a few exceptions, however, you can expressly disinherit children.

SURROGATE COURT

See probate court.

RULE AGAINST PERPETUITIES

An exceedingly complex legal doctrine that limits the amount of time that property can be controlled after death by a person's instructions in a will. For examp... (more...)
An exceedingly complex legal doctrine that limits the amount of time that property can be controlled after death by a person's instructions in a will. For example, a person would not be allowed to leave property to her husband for his life, then to her children for their lives, then to her grandchildren. The gift would potentially go to the grandchildren at a point too remote in time.

GRANTOR RETAINED INCOME TRUST

Irrevocable trusts designed to save on estate tax. There are several kinds; with all of them, you keep income from trust property, or use of that property, for ... (more...)
Irrevocable trusts designed to save on estate tax. There are several kinds; with all of them, you keep income from trust property, or use of that property, for a period of years. When the trust ends, the property goes to the final beneficiaries you've named. These trusts are for people who have enough wealth to feel comfortable giving away a substantial hunk of property. They come in three flavors: Grantor-Retained Annuity Trusts (GRATs), Grantor-Retained Unitrusts (GRUTs) and Grantor-Retained Income Trusts (GRITs).

ABATEMENT

A reduction. After a death, abatement occurs if the deceased person didn't leave enough property to fulfill all the bequests made in the will and meet other exp... (more...)
A reduction. After a death, abatement occurs if the deceased person didn't leave enough property to fulfill all the bequests made in the will and meet other expenses. Gifts left in the will are cut back in order to pay taxes, satisfy debts or take care of other gifts that are given priority under law or by the will itself.

KINDRED

Under some state's probate codes, all relatives of a deceased person.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

In re Estate of Gist

... death, to the extent of such interests, including but not limited to interests in jointly held property, retained life estates, and interests in trusts." Id. ... In Barkema, we identified the two classifications of support trusts, a pure support trust and a discretionary support trust. Id. at 53-54. ...

IN THE MATTER OF ESTATE OF McDOWELL

... Jur. 2d Wills § 196, at 403 (2002). Such a provision is authorized under Iowa and Oregon statutes, [2] both adapted from the Uniform Testamentary Additions to Trusts Act (1960) ("UTATA"). ... 1 Austin W. Scott et al., Scott and Ascher on Trusts § 7.1.3, at 352 (Aspen 5th ed. 2006). ...

IN RE MATTER OF TRUST UNDER THE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF WEITZEL

... Bass, 196 NW2d at 435; see also In re Woltersdorf, 255 Iowa 914, 916, 124 NW2d 510, 511 (1963) ("The matter of fees for executors and trustees rests within the sound discretion of the trial court."); Restatement (Third) of Trusts § 38 cmt. ...