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Jean L. Welty Lawyer

Jean L. Welty

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Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Divorce, Child Support

Jean Welty is a practicing lawyer in the state of Connecticut specializing in Matrimonial and Family Law. Welty Esposito & Wieler LLC are New Haven... (more)

Deena Lynn Gans Lawyer

Deena Lynn Gans

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Divorce & Family Law, Child Support, Alimony & Spousal Support, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Child Custody

Attorney Gans is known for competence, integrity, compassion, and the use of effective resolution tactics. While we are experienced and prepared to ta... (more)

Bruce W. Diamond Lawyer

Bruce W. Diamond

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Family Law, Divorce, Personal Injury, Car Accident, DUI-DWI
Taking great care of our clients for over 30 years.

Attorney Bruce W. Diamond received his B.A. in government from St. Lawrence University in 1982, and graduated from UCONN School of Law in 1985. He was... (more)

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Bernard Christianson

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Stacy L. Nobles

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Children's Rights
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William P. Burns

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Karen Reynolds

Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Children's Rights, Farms
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Dennis Edward Curtis

Divorce, Medical Malpractice
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LEGAL TERMS

ANNULMENT

A court procedure that dissolves a marriage and treats it as if it never happened. Annulments are rare since the advent of no-fault divorce but may be obtained ... (more...)
A court procedure that dissolves a marriage and treats it as if it never happened. Annulments are rare since the advent of no-fault divorce but may be obtained in most states for one of the following reasons: misrepresentation, concealment (for example, of an addiction or criminal record), misunderstanding and refusal to consummate the marriage.

HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD

A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income ta... (more...)
A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income tax law, you are eligible for favorable tax treatment as the head of household only if you are unmarried and you manage a household which is the principal residence (for more than half of the year) of dependent children or other dependent relatives. Under bankruptcy homestead and exemption laws, the terms householder and 'head of household' mean the same thing. Examples include a single woman supporting her disabled sister and her own children or a bachelor supporting his parents. Many states consider a single person supporting only himself to be a head of household as well.

SEPARATION

A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though... (more...)
A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though they may continue their relationship. A legal separation results when the parties separate and a court rules on the division of property, such as alimony or child support -- but does not grant a divorce.

DESERTION

The voluntary abandonment of one spouse by the other, without the abandoned spouse's consent. Commonly, desertion occurs when a spouse leaves the marital home f... (more...)
The voluntary abandonment of one spouse by the other, without the abandoned spouse's consent. Commonly, desertion occurs when a spouse leaves the marital home for a specified length of time. Desertion is a grounds for divorce in states with fault divorce.

CLOSE CORPORATION

A corporation owned and operated by a few individuals, often members of the same family, rather than by public shareholders. State laws permit close corporation... (more...)
A corporation owned and operated by a few individuals, often members of the same family, rather than by public shareholders. State laws permit close corporations to function more informally than regular corporations. For example, shareholders can make decisions without holding meetings of the board of directors, and can fill vacancies on the board without a vote of the shareholders.

SPLIT CUSTODY

A custody arrangement in the case of multiple children, awarding sole custody of one child to one parent and sole custody of another child to the other parent. ... (more...)
A custody arrangement in the case of multiple children, awarding sole custody of one child to one parent and sole custody of another child to the other parent. This arrangement is generally disfavored by judges because they are reluctant to split up siblings.

GIFT TAXES

Federal taxes assessed on any gift, or combination of gifts, from one person to another that exceeds $12,000 in one year. Several kinds of gifts are exempt form... (more...)
Federal taxes assessed on any gift, or combination of gifts, from one person to another that exceeds $12,000 in one year. Several kinds of gifts are exempt form this tax: gifts to tax-exempt charities, gifts to your spouse (limited to $120,000 annually if the recipient isn't a U.S. citizen) and gifts made for tuition or medical bills. In addition to the annual gift tax exclusion, there is a $1 million cumulative tax exemption for gifts. In other words, you can give away a total of $1 million during your lifetime -- over and above the gifts you give using the annual exclusion -- without paying gift taxes.

STEPPARENT ADOPTION

The formal, legal adoption of a child by a stepparent who is living with a legal parent. Most states have special provisions making stepparent adoptions relativ... (more...)
The formal, legal adoption of a child by a stepparent who is living with a legal parent. Most states have special provisions making stepparent adoptions relatively easy if the child's noncustodial parent gives consent, is dead or missing, or has abandoned the child.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge ... (more...)
An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge on her own (sua sponte). For example, in a divorce, at the request of one parent a judge might issue an order directing the other parent to appear in court on a particular date and time to show cause why the first parent should not be given sole physical custody of the children. Although it would seem that the person receiving an order to show cause is at a procedural disadvantage--she, after all, is the one who is told to come up with a convincing reason why the judge shouldn't order something--both sides normally have an equal chance to convince the judge to rule in their favor.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Weiss v. Weiss

... 585, 595-96, 804 A.2d 170 (2002). It "is fully applicable to judgments and decrees entered in an action for a divorce...." Internal quotation marks omitted.) Loughlin v. Loughlin, 280 Conn. ... Jur. 2d 572-73, Divorce and Separation § 411 (1998). ...

Davis v. Davis

... Richard Davis commenced a divorce action against the plaintiff on or about November 19, 2002, and during the course of the divorce proceedings the plaintiff learned that he had begun a sexual relationship with Julie Davis prior to the time he left the marital residence. ...

State v. Kalican

... Kaya initiated a divorce action in May or June, 2002. ... Following the divorce, the defendant retained a key to the former marital home, located at 86 Blackhall Street in New London, and would stay there when visiting the children. ...