Pensacola Wills & Probate Lawyer, Florida


Includes: Estate Administration, Living Wills, Wills

Suzanne Noland Whibbs Lawyer

Suzanne Noland Whibbs

VERIFIED
Social Security, Wills & Probate, Workers' Compensation, DUI-DWI, Personal Injury

Suzanne Whibbs received her undergraduate degree from the Auburn University in 1993. In 1997, she received her J.D. from Cumberland School of Law at S... (more)

Gerald L Brown

Banking & Finance, Corporate, Estate Planning, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Phillip A. Pugh

Corporate, Business Organization, Estate Planning, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Alphonse G Condon

Banking & Finance, Corporate, Estate Administration, Mental Health
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Alan Sheppard

Estate Planning, Wills & Probate, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Sarah Dyrda Crane

Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Corporate, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           

W. Spencer Mitchem

Banking & Finance, Business Organization, Mental Health, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

James Martinez Burns

Wills & Probate, Family Law, Criminal, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years

Joseph W C Boyles

Real Estate, Wills & Probate, Trusts, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

William Jemison Mims

Traffic, Wills & Probate, Criminal, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  25 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

DISINHERIT

To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit prope... (more...)
To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit property -- a close family member, for example -- should not receive it. In most states, you cannot completely disinherit your spouse; a surviving spouse has the right to claim a portion (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's estate. With a few exceptions, however, you can expressly disinherit children.

SPENDTHRIFT TRUST

A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the benefi... (more...)
A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the beneficiary as needed, and sometimes paying third parties (creditors, for example) on the beneficiary's behalf, bypassing the beneficiary completely. Spendthrift trusts typically contain a provision prohibiting creditors from seizing the trust fund to satisfy the beneficiary's debts. These trusts are legal in most states, even though creditors hate them.

PRETERMITTED HEIR

A child or spouse who is not mentioned in a will and whom the court believes was accidentally overlooked by the person who made the will. For example, a child b... (more...)
A child or spouse who is not mentioned in a will and whom the court believes was accidentally overlooked by the person who made the will. For example, a child born or adopted after the will is made may be deemed a pretermitted heir. If the court determines that an heir was accidentally omitted, that heir is entitled to receive the same share of the estate as she would have if the deceased had died without a will. A pretermitted heir is sometimes called an 'omitted heir.'

MARITAL LIFE ESTATE TRUST

See AB trust.

AUGMENTED ESTATE

In general terms, an augmented estate consists of property owned by both a deceased person and his or her spouse. The concept of the augmented estate is used on... (more...)
In general terms, an augmented estate consists of property owned by both a deceased person and his or her spouse. The concept of the augmented estate is used only in some states. Its value is calculated only if a surviving spouse declines whatever he or she was left by will and instead claims a share of the deceased spouse's estate. (This is called taking against the will.) The amount of this 'statutory share' or 'elective share' depends on state law.

AB TRUST

A trust that allows couples to reduce or avoid estate taxes. Each spouse puts his or her property in an AB trust. When the first spouse dies, his or her half of... (more...)
A trust that allows couples to reduce or avoid estate taxes. Each spouse puts his or her property in an AB trust. When the first spouse dies, his or her half of the property goes to the beneficiaries named in the trust -- commonly, the grown children of the couple -- with the crucial condition that the surviving spouse has the right to use the property for life and is entitled to any income it generates. The surviving spouse may even be allowed to spend principal in certain circumstances. When the surviving spouse dies, the property passes to the trust beneficiaries. It is not considered part of the second spouse's estate for estate tax purposes. Using this kind of trust keeps the second spouse's taxable estate half the size it would be if the property were left directly to the spouse. This type of trust is also known as a bypass or credit shelter trust.

WILL

A document in which you specify what is to be done with your property when you die and name your executor. You can also use your will to name a guardian for you... (more...)
A document in which you specify what is to be done with your property when you die and name your executor. You can also use your will to name a guardian for your young children.

EXEMPTION TRUST

A bypass trust funded with an amount no larger than the personal federal estate tax exemption in the year of death. If the trust grantor leaves property worth m... (more...)
A bypass trust funded with an amount no larger than the personal federal estate tax exemption in the year of death. If the trust grantor leaves property worth more than that amount, it usually goes to the surviving spouse. The trust property passes free from estate tax because of the personal exemption, and the rest is shielded from tax under the surviving spouse's marital deduction.

SELF-PROVING WILL

A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-prov... (more...)
A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-proving when two witnesses sign under penalty of perjury that they observed the willmaker sign it and that he told them it was his will. If no one contests the validity of the will, the probate court will accept the will without hearing the testimony of the witnesses or other evidence. To make a self-proving will in other states, the willmaker and one or more witnesses must sign an affidavit (sworn statement) before a notary public certifying that the will is genuine and that all willmaking formalities have been observed.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

IN RE AMEND. TO THE FLORIDA PROBATE RULES

After considering the Committee's proposals and reviewing the relevant legislation, we adopt all the Committee's proposals except the proposed amendment to subdivision (b) of rule 5.260. Consistent with statutory changes made by chapter 2010-132, section 3, Laws of ...

McCormick v. McCormick

... We have for review an order admitting to probate the Last Will and Testament of decedent Ferral Lee McCormick, Sr., but denying letters of administration to appellant Ferral Lee McCormick, Jr., whom the testate decedent had duly nominated as personal representative. ...

In re Guardianship of Shell

... VILLANTI, Judge. Lutheran Services Florida, Inc., the guardian of Bertha Shell, appeals from the probate court's order denying its objections to an earlier order that awarded Lutheran Services guardian's fees in an amount less than it requested. ...