Pleasant Hope Estate Planning Lawyer, Missouri


Includes: Gift Taxation

Leland C. Bussell

Estate Planning, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kevin J. Rapp

Education, Estate Planning, Family Law, Insurance, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Michael J. DeArmon

Corporate, Estate Planning, Divestitures, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Bruce K. Kirby

Social Security -- Disability, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Anne Sallee Mason

Estate Administration, Gift Taxation, Estate Planning, Guardianships & Conservatorships
Status:  In Good Standing           

Stuart P. Huffman

Litigation, Estate Planning, Family Law, Criminal, Insurance
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jerry L. Redfern

Corporate, Business Organization, Estate Planning, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Donald Lane Brown

Oil & Gas, Industry Specialties, Estate Planning, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  16 Years

Brandy Mellissa Mcshane

Dispute Resolution, Estate Planning, Adoption, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years

James Robert Schumacher

Estate Planning, Family Law, Elder Law, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  34 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Easily find Pleasant Hope Estate Planning Lawyers and Pleasant Hope Estate Planning Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Estate areas including Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

NONPROBATE

The distribution of a deceased person's property by any means other than probate. Many types of property pass free of probate, including property left to a surv... (more...)
The distribution of a deceased person's property by any means other than probate. Many types of property pass free of probate, including property left to a surviving spouse and property left outside of a will through probate-avoidance methods such as pay-on-death designations, joint tenancy ownership, living trusts and life insurance. Property that avoids probate is sometimes described as the 'nonprobate estate.' Nonprobate distribution may also occur if the deceased person leaves an invalid will. In that case, property will pass according to the particular state's laws of intestate succession.

ADMINISTRATRIX

An outdated term for a female administrator -- the person appointed by a court to handle probate on behalf of someone who died without a will. Now, whether male... (more...)
An outdated term for a female administrator -- the person appointed by a court to handle probate on behalf of someone who died without a will. Now, whether male or female, this person is called the administrator.

FUNDING A TRUST

Transferring ownership of property to a trust.

ESTATE PLANNING

The art of continuing to prosper when you're alive, and passing your property to your loved ones with a minimum of fuss and expense after you die. Planning your... (more...)
The art of continuing to prosper when you're alive, and passing your property to your loved ones with a minimum of fuss and expense after you die. Planning your estate may involve making a will, living trust, healthcare directives, durable power of attorney for finances or other documents.

PROVING A WILL

Convincing a probate court that a document is truly the deceased person's will. Usually this is a simple formality that the executor or administrator easily sat... (more...)
Convincing a probate court that a document is truly the deceased person's will. Usually this is a simple formality that the executor or administrator easily satisfies by showing that the will was signed and dated by the deceased person in front of two or more witnesses. When the will is holographic -- that is, completely handwritten by the deceased and not witnessed, it is still valid in many states if the executor can produce relatives and friends to testify that the handwriting is that of the deceased.

GROSS ESTATE

For federal estate tax filing purposes, the total of all property owned at death, without regard to any debts or liens against the property or the costs of prob... (more...)
For federal estate tax filing purposes, the total of all property owned at death, without regard to any debts or liens against the property or the costs of probate. Taxes are due only on the value of the property the person actually owned (the net estate) plus the amount of any taxable gifts made during life. In a few states, the gross estate is used when computing attorney fees for probating estates; the lawyer gets a percentage of the gross estate.

CURATOR

See conservator.

OFFICER

A person elected by a profit or nonprofit corporation's board of directors, or by the manager of a limited liability company, to manage the day-to-day operation... (more...)
A person elected by a profit or nonprofit corporation's board of directors, or by the manager of a limited liability company, to manage the day-to-day operations of the organization. Officers generally hold titles such as President or Treasurer. Many states and most corporate bylaws or LLC operating agreements require a corporation or LLC to have a president, secretary and treasurer. Election of a vice president may be required by state law.

ALTERNATE BENEFICIARY

A person, organization or institution that receives property through a will, trust or insurance policy when the first named beneficiary is unable or refuses to ... (more...)
A person, organization or institution that receives property through a will, trust or insurance policy when the first named beneficiary is unable or refuses to take the property. For example, in his will Jake leaves his collection of sheet music to his daughter, Mia, and names the local symphony as alternate beneficiary. When Jake dies, Mia decides that the symphony can make better use of the sheet music than she can, so she refuses (disclaims) the gift, and the manuscripts pass directly to the symphony. In insurance law, the alternate beneficiary, usually the person who receives the insurance proceeds because the initial or primary beneficiary has died, is called the secondary or contingent beneficiary.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Cramer v. Smoot

... Without seeking his permission, Smoot and Rice, Cramer's step-children, withdrew $58,000 from the senior citizen's savings account. Both were listed on the account for estate planning purposes only, and at no time had they contributed any money to the account. ...

WATERMANN v. Fitzpatrick

... a. Eleanor was unable to get out of the car she was in, to execute her Trust and other estate planning documents; ... a. Wallace and Bonita saw Eleanor every day; b. Bonita scheduled Eleanor's appointment with Mr. Zick, to discuss Eleanor's estate planning, and. ...

IN THE MATTER OF GENE WILD INSURANCE TRUST US BANK

... On July 10, 1990, Shirley Gene Wild ("Decedent") executed a number of estate-planning documents, including the Gene Wild Revocable Trust agreement, which created the Gene Wild Revocable Trust ("Revocable Trust"), and the Gene Wild Insurance Trust agreement, which ...