Providence Divorce Lawyer, Rhode Island, page 2

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Includes: Alimony & Spousal Support

Christopher Lefebvre

Divorce, Divorce & Family Law, Bankruptcy, Bankruptcy & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Steven J. Hirsch

Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Farms, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  42 Years

Cristina A. Azzinaro

Alimony & Spousal Support, Criminal, Bankruptcy Litigation, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  17 Years

Felicia A. Manni-Paquette

Alimony & Spousal Support, Criminal, Bankruptcy, Bankruptcy Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years
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Tom Thomasian

Personal Injury, DUI-DWI, Divorce, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Lawrence L. Goldberg

Administrative Law, Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Animal Bite
Status:  In Good Standing           

David Borts

Divorce, Personal Injury, Immigration, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Veronica Assalone

Family Law, Divorce, Criminal, Personal Injury

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Harry J. Hoopis

Adoption, Affirmative Action, Age Discrimination, Alimony & Spousal Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

Matthew Gabrilowitz

Social Security, Workers' Compensation, Divorce, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

PETITIONER

A person who initiates a lawsuit. A synonym for plaintiff, used almost universally in some states and in others for certain types of lawsuits, most commonly div... (more...)
A person who initiates a lawsuit. A synonym for plaintiff, used almost universally in some states and in others for certain types of lawsuits, most commonly divorce and other family law cases.

RESTRAINING ORDER

An order from a court directing one person not to do something, such as make contact with another person, enter the family home or remove a child from the state... (more...)
An order from a court directing one person not to do something, such as make contact with another person, enter the family home or remove a child from the state. Restraining orders are typically issued in cases in which spousal abuse or stalking is feared -- or has occurred -- in an attempt to ensure the victim's safety. Restraining orders are also commonly issued to cool down ugly disputes between neighbors.

SEPARATION

A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though... (more...)
A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though they may continue their relationship. A legal separation results when the parties separate and a court rules on the division of property, such as alimony or child support -- but does not grant a divorce.

AGE OF MAJORITY

Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in ... (more...)
Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in the armed forces and purchase alcohol. Also, parents may stop making child support payments when a child reaches the age of majority. In most states the age of majority is 18, but this varies depending on the activity. For example, in some states people are allowed to vote when they reach the age of eighteen, but can't purchase alcohol until they're 21.

BEST INTERESTS (OF THE CHILD)

The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best inter... (more...)
The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best interests of the child. Similarly, when asked to decide on custody issues in a divorce case, the judge will base his or her decision on the child's best interests. And the same test is used when judges decide whether a child should be removed from a parent's home because of neglect or abuse. Factors considered by the court in deciding the best interests of a child include: age and sex of the child mental and physical health of the child mental and physical health of the parents lifestyle and other social factors of the parents emotional ties between the parents and the child ability of the parents to provide the child with food, shelter, clothing and medical care established living pattern for the child concerning school, home, community and religious institution quality of schooling, and the child's preference.

HEARING

In the trial court context, a legal proceeding (other than a full-scale trial) held before a judge. During a hearing, evidence and arguments are presented in an... (more...)
In the trial court context, a legal proceeding (other than a full-scale trial) held before a judge. During a hearing, evidence and arguments are presented in an effort to resolve a disputed factual or legal issue. Hearings typically, but by no means always, occur prior to trial when a party asks the judge to decide a specific issue--often on an interim basis--such as whether a temporary restraining order or preliminary injunction should be issued, or temporary child custody or child support awarded. In the administrative or agency law context, a hearing is usually a proceeding before an administrative hearing officer or judge representing an agency that has the power to regulate a particular field or oversee a governmental benefit program. For example, the Federal Aviation Board (FAB) has the authority to hold hearings on airline safety, and a state Worker's Compensation Appeals Board has the power to rule on the appeals of people whose applications for benefits have been denied.

STEPPARENT ADOPTION

The formal, legal adoption of a child by a stepparent who is living with a legal parent. Most states have special provisions making stepparent adoptions relativ... (more...)
The formal, legal adoption of a child by a stepparent who is living with a legal parent. Most states have special provisions making stepparent adoptions relatively easy if the child's noncustodial parent gives consent, is dead or missing, or has abandoned the child.

MISUNDERSTANDING

A mistake by both spouses in a marriage that can serve as grounds for an annulment. For example, if one spouse went into the marriage wanting children while the... (more...)
A mistake by both spouses in a marriage that can serve as grounds for an annulment. For example, if one spouse went into the marriage wanting children while the other did not, they have a misunderstanding that will be judged serious enough for a court to terminate the marriage.

FAULT DIVORCE

A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorc... (more...)
A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorce from the 'guilty' spouse. Today, 35 states still allow a spouse to allege fault in obtaining a divorce. The traditional fault grounds for divorce are adultery, cruelty, desertion, confinement in prison, physical incapacity and incurable insanity. These grounds are also generally referred to as marital misconduct.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Cronan v. Iwon

... This case arises from defendants' legal representation of plaintiff in her divorce from her former husband. The divorce proceedings commenced in the Family Court on October 4, 1996, when plaintiff's former husband filed a complaint for divorce. ...

Fravala v. City of Cranston ex rel. Baron

... Lillian). Constance married Donald in 1957, and they had five children together. They were granted a divorce on June 17, 1968. Wilbur ... In 1967, Lillian was granted a divorce from "bed, board and future cohabitation" with Wilbur. It is ...

Paul v. Paul

... In December 2005, after nearly ten years of marriage, Sharie filed a complaint 991 for divorce. ... After a hearing on the merits, the trial justice granted both Shade's complaint and Marvin's counterclaim for an absolute divorce on the grounds of irreconcilable differences. ...