Reading Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Massachusetts

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Robert A. Jutras Lawyer

Robert A. Jutras

Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Elder Law, Business

Bob has been practicing law for twenty-nine years and is licensed in Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Maine. Bob attended the University of New Hampsh... (more)

Mark M. Curley

Alimony & Spousal Support, Criminal, Aviation Accident, Animal Bite
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Patrick G. Curley

Bankruptcy, Business Organization, Criminal, Divorce
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Joanne L. Goulka

Adoption, Affirmative Action, Age Discrimination, Alcoholic Beverages
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William F Crowley

Estate Planning, Family Law, Personal Injury, Wills & Probate
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Richard C. Chambers

Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate
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John N. Papantonakis

Land Use & Zoning, Real Estate, Family Law, Bankruptcy
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Robert A. Prousalis

Family Law, Divorce, Elder Law, Banking & Finance
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William P. Doyle

Real Estate, Estate Planning, Workers' Compensation, Family Law, Personal Injury
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Thomas F. Colonna

Estate Planning, Family Law, Personal Injury, Real Estate, Trusts
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LEGAL TERMS

SPOUSAL SUPPORT

See alimony.

MISUNDERSTANDING

A mistake by both spouses in a marriage that can serve as grounds for an annulment. For example, if one spouse went into the marriage wanting children while the... (more...)
A mistake by both spouses in a marriage that can serve as grounds for an annulment. For example, if one spouse went into the marriage wanting children while the other did not, they have a misunderstanding that will be judged serious enough for a court to terminate the marriage.

FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT (FMLA)

A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family hea... (more...)
A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family health needs or personal illness. The employer must allow the employee to return to the same position or a position similar to that held before taking the leave. There are exceptions to the FMLA: the most notable is that only employers with 50 or more employees are covered--about half the workforce.

MARTIAL MISCONDUCT

See fault divorce.

INCOMPATIBILITY

A conflict in personalities that makes married life together impossible. In a number of states, incompatibility is the accepted reason for a no-fault divorce. C... (more...)
A conflict in personalities that makes married life together impossible. In a number of states, incompatibility is the accepted reason for a no-fault divorce. Compare irreconcilable differences; irremediable breakdown.

GUARDIANSHIP

A legal relationship created by a court between a guardian and his ward--either a minor child or an incapacitated adult. The guardian has a legal right and duty... (more...)
A legal relationship created by a court between a guardian and his ward--either a minor child or an incapacitated adult. The guardian has a legal right and duty to care for the ward. This may involve making personal decisions on his or her behalf, managing property or both. Guardianships of incapacitated adults are more typically called conservatorships .

TENANCY BY THE ENTIRETY

A special kind of property ownership that's only for married couples. Both spouses have the right to enjoy the entire property, and when one spouse dies, the su... (more...)
A special kind of property ownership that's only for married couples. Both spouses have the right to enjoy the entire property, and when one spouse dies, the surviving spouse gets title to the property (called a right of survivorship). It is similar to joint tenancy, but it is available in only about half the states.

CONSOLIDATED OMNIBUS BUDGET RECONCILIATION ACT (COBRA)

A federal law requiring that employers offer employees -- and their spouses and dependents -- continuing insurance coverage if their work hours are cut or they ... (more...)
A federal law requiring that employers offer employees -- and their spouses and dependents -- continuing insurance coverage if their work hours are cut or they lose their job for any reason other than gross misconduct. Courts are still in the process of determining the meaning of gross misconduct, but it's clearly more serious than poor performance or judgment. COBRA also makes an ex-spouse and children eligible to receive group rate health insurance provided by the other ex-spouse's employer for three years following a divorce.

VISITATION RIGHTS

The right to see a child regularly, typically awarded by the court to the parent who does not have physical custody of the child. The court will deny visitation... (more...)
The right to see a child regularly, typically awarded by the court to the parent who does not have physical custody of the child. The court will deny visitation rights only if it decides that visitation would hurt the child so much that the parent should be kept away.