Roseville Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, California

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Richard Edward Quiles Lawyer

Richard Edward Quiles

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Child Support, Child Custody

Richard Quiles joined Gale, Angelo, Johnson & Pruett Law, P.C. in 2018. He is originally from the San Francisco Bay Area and loves Bay Area sports tea... (more)

Lauren Rachelle Pruett Lawyer

Lauren Rachelle Pruett

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Divorce, Child Custody, Child Support
Consultation fee of $250

Lauren Pruett is a Partner and shareholder of Gale, Angelo, Johnson & Pruett P.C.. Lauren oversees our Family Law Department. She focuses exclusiv... (more)

Natalya L. Kalinovskiy Lawyer

Natalya L. Kalinovskiy

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Family Law

Natalya L. Kalinovskiy began her legal career after receiving her juris doctor from McGeorge School of Law at the University of the Pacific with conce... (more)

Allan Robert Frumkin Lawyer

Allan Robert Frumkin

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Bankruptcy & Debt, Accident & Injury, Employment

Lawyer.com Member Questionnaire Please describe a case(s) in the last year or two where you made a big difference. 1. Last Friday---family law ... (more)

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Hal David Bartholomew Lawyer

Hal David Bartholomew

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Child Custody, Child Support, Collaborative Law

Mr. Bartholomew, a native of Elk Grove, California, received his Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science at the University of California, Davis, ... (more)

Ben Isaac Jacob Lawyer

Ben Isaac Jacob

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, DUI-DWI, Felony, Divorce

Ben Jacob earned his Juris Doctorate from The University of California, Hastings College of the Law where he served as a Teaching Assistant for two di... (more)

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800-638-7710

L. Heather Cassady

Adoption, Dispute Resolution, Child Support, Farms
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Frank F. Ali

Divorce & Family Law
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Jessica Ann Ryan

Divorce & Family Law
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Michael Lee Hanks

Family Law, Franchising, Banking & Finance, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE

A document that provides proof of a marriage, typically issued to the newlyweds a few weeks after they file for the certificate in a county office. Most states ... (more...)
A document that provides proof of a marriage, typically issued to the newlyweds a few weeks after they file for the certificate in a county office. Most states require both spouses, the person who officiated the marriage and one or two witnesses to sign the marriage certificate; often this is done just after the ceremony.

INTERLOCUTORY DECREE

A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. ... (more...)
A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. In the past, interlocutory decrees were most often used in divorces. The terms of the divorce were set out in an interlocutory decree, which would become final only after a waiting period. The purpose of the waiting period was to allow the couple time to reconcile. They rarely did, however, so most states no longer use interlocutory decrees of divorce.

MARITAL SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT

See divorce agreement.

CHILD

(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born o... (more...)
(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born outside of marriage. (2) A person under an age specified by law, often 14 or 16. For example, state law may require a person to be over the age of 14 to make a valid will, or may define the crime of statutory rape as sex with a person under the age of 16. In this sense, a child can be distinguished from a minor, who is a person under the age of 18 in most states. A person below the specified legal age who is married is often considered an adult rather than a child. See also emancipation.

PALIMONY

A non-legal term coined by journalists to describe the division of property or alimony-like support given by one member of an unmarried couple to the other afte... (more...)
A non-legal term coined by journalists to describe the division of property or alimony-like support given by one member of an unmarried couple to the other after they break up.

FOSTER CHILD

A child placed by a government agency or a court in the care of someone other than his or her natural parents. Foster children may be removed from their family ... (more...)
A child placed by a government agency or a court in the care of someone other than his or her natural parents. Foster children may be removed from their family home because of parental abuse or neglect. Occasionally, parents voluntarily place their children in foster care. See foster care.

CUSTODY (OF A CHILD)

The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When ... (more...)
The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When parents separate or divorce, one of the hardest decisions they have to make is which parent will have custody. The most common arrangement is for one parent to have custody (both physical and legal) while the other parent has a right of visitation. But it is not uncommon for the parents to share legal custody, even though one parent has physical custody. The most uncommon arrangement is for the parents to share both legal and physical custody.

COMMUNITY PROPERTY

A method for defining the ownership of property acquired during marriage, in which all earnings during marriage and all property acquired with those earnings ar... (more...)
A method for defining the ownership of property acquired during marriage, in which all earnings during marriage and all property acquired with those earnings are considered community property and all debts incurred during marriage are community property debts. Community property laws exist in Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin. Compare equitable distribution and separate property.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.