Saint Charles Family Law Lawyer, Illinois

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Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Rory Thomas Weiler Lawyer

Rory Thomas Weiler

Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Custody & Visitation, Child Custody, Paternity

Rory T. Weiler is a fellow of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers (AAML) who concentrates his practice in family law, with an emphasis on case... (more)

Tricia Dawn Goostree Lawyer

Tricia Dawn Goostree

Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Family Law, Child Custody, Child Support

Tricia D. Goostree knew she wanted to be an attorney since she was a little girl. She was selected for Eastern Illinois University's mock trial in col... (more)

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CONTACT

630-584-4800

Otto S. Hurtado Lawyer

Otto S. Hurtado

Divorce & Family Law, Adoption, Child Custody, Custody & Visitation, Collaborative Law

Otto S. Hurtado is an experienced family law attorney. He is certified as a Family Law Mediator and Guardian ad Litem. Mr. Hurtado is a Graduate of th... (more)

Emily J. Rapp Lawyer

Emily J. Rapp

Divorce & Family Law, Estate Planning, Custody & Visitation, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Emily J. Rapp is a well-respected family law and estate planning attorney who represents clients throughout Kane County, DuPage County, and Kendall Co... (more)

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CONTACT

630-402-0185

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Danya A Grunyk

Farms, Collaborative Law, Child Support, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           

David W. Nordin

Bankruptcy, Credit & Debt, Family Law, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

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James E. Sturino

Family Law, Corporate, Business Organization, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Leah Setzen

Family Law, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

Stephen M. Jacobs

Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Family Law, Alimony & Spousal Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

Theodore L. Kuzniar

Real Estate, Family Law, Divorce, Personal Injury

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LEGAL TERMS

DILUTION

A situation in which a famous trademark or service mark is used in a context in which the mark's reputation for quality is tarnished or its distinction is blurr... (more...)
A situation in which a famous trademark or service mark is used in a context in which the mark's reputation for quality is tarnished or its distinction is blurred. In this case, trademark infringement exists even though there is no likelihood of customer confusion, which is usually required in cases of trademark infringement. For example, the use of the word Candyland for a pornographic site on the Internet was ruled to dilute the reputation of the Candyland mark for the well-known children's game, even though the traditional basis for trademark infringement (probable customer confusion) wasn't an issue.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge ... (more...)
An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge on her own (sua sponte). For example, in a divorce, at the request of one parent a judge might issue an order directing the other parent to appear in court on a particular date and time to show cause why the first parent should not be given sole physical custody of the children. Although it would seem that the person receiving an order to show cause is at a procedural disadvantage--she, after all, is the one who is told to come up with a convincing reason why the judge shouldn't order something--both sides normally have an equal chance to convince the judge to rule in their favor.

INTERLOCUTORY DECREE

A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. ... (more...)
A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. In the past, interlocutory decrees were most often used in divorces. The terms of the divorce were set out in an interlocutory decree, which would become final only after a waiting period. The purpose of the waiting period was to allow the couple time to reconcile. They rarely did, however, so most states no longer use interlocutory decrees of divorce.

SOLE CUSTODY

An arrangement whereby only one parent has physical and legal custody of a child and the other parent has visitation rights.

PATERNITY SUIT

A lawsuit to determine the identity of the father of a child born outside of marriage, and to provide for the support of the child once the identity of the fath... (more...)
A lawsuit to determine the identity of the father of a child born outside of marriage, and to provide for the support of the child once the identity of the father has been determined.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.

CUSTODIAN

A term used by the Uniform Transfers to Minors Act for the person named to manage property left to a child under the terms of that Act. The custodian will manag... (more...)
A term used by the Uniform Transfers to Minors Act for the person named to manage property left to a child under the terms of that Act. The custodian will manage the property if the gift giver dies before the child has reached the age specified by state law -- usually 21. When the child reaches the specified age, he will receive the property and the custodian will have no further role in its management.

ADOPTIVE PARENT

A person who completes all the requirements to legally adopt a child who is not his or her biological child. Generally, any single or married adult who is deter... (more...)
A person who completes all the requirements to legally adopt a child who is not his or her biological child. Generally, any single or married adult who is determined to be a 'fit parent' may adopt a child. Some states have special requirements, such as age or residency criteria. An adoptive parent has all the responsibilities of a biological parent.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

ILLINOIS DEPT. OF HEALTHCARE v. Warner

... rights were terminated, (2) the children had been in the custody and guardianship of the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS ... The parent still has a residual, common law duty to support the child, and this residual duty stands as an exception to section 17 of ...

Blum v. Koster

... terminated for some reason, a separate award for child support would be agreed upon by the parties or determined by the court. [3] E. Mirabelli, Family Law Case Update, Law Update, ISBA Annual Meeting (June 27, 2008).

AMERICAN FAMILY MUT. v. NORTHERN HERITAGE

... Pursuant to section 2-615 (735 ILCS 5/2-615 (West 2008)), the motion argued that the third amended complaint was insufficient at law for the following reasons: 1) American Family failed to plead how and when it became the subrogee of McGrath's rights of action in violation of ...