Madrid Criminal Lawyer, Spain


Sara D Rojas

General Practice
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  22 Years

Alberto Luis Azagra Malo

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  10 Years

Rebeca Lizasoain-Brandys

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  17 Years

Jose Maria Bano

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  11 Years

Steven L. Plehn

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  33 Years

Andres Ballesteros

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  19 Years

Vera Sopena Blanco

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  14 Years

Maria Veronica Queixalos

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  14 Years

Jaime Sanchez

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  22 Years

Sebastian Deschler

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

LEGISLATIVE IMMUNITY

A legal doctrine that prevents legislators from being sued for actions performed and decisions made in the course of serving in government. This doctrine does n... (more...)
A legal doctrine that prevents legislators from being sued for actions performed and decisions made in the course of serving in government. This doctrine does not protect legislators from criminal prosecution, nor does it relieve them from responsibility for actions outside the scope of their office, such as the nefarious activities of former Senator Bob Packwood.

PROSECUTOR

A lawyer who works for the local, state or federal government to bring and litigate criminal cases.

INFRACTION

A minor violation of the law that is punishable only by a fine--for example, a traffic or parking ticket. Not all vehicle-related violations are infractions, ho... (more...)
A minor violation of the law that is punishable only by a fine--for example, a traffic or parking ticket. Not all vehicle-related violations are infractions, however--refusing to identify oneself when involved in an accident is a misdemeanor in some states.

CONTINGENCY FEE

A method of paying a lawyer for legal representation by which, instead of an hourly or per job fee, the lawyer receives a percentage of the money her client obt... (more...)
A method of paying a lawyer for legal representation by which, instead of an hourly or per job fee, the lawyer receives a percentage of the money her client obtains after settling or winning the case. Often contingency fee agreements -- which are most commonly used in personal injury cases -- award the successful lawyer between 20% and 50% of the amount recovered. Lawyers representing defendants charged with crimes may not charge contingency fees. In most states, contingency fee agreements must be in writing.

IMPRISON

To put a person in prison or jail or otherwise confine him as punishment for committing a crime.

SENTENCE

Punishment in a criminal case. A sentence can range from a fine and community service to life imprisonment or death. For most crimes, the sentence is chosen by ... (more...)
Punishment in a criminal case. A sentence can range from a fine and community service to life imprisonment or death. For most crimes, the sentence is chosen by the trial judge; the jury chooses the sentence only in a capital case, when it must choose between life in prison without parole and death.

CONVICTION

A finding by a judge or jury that the defendant is guilty of a crime.

MCNAGHTEN RULE

The earliest and most common test for criminal insanity, in which a criminal defendant is judged legally insane only if he could not distinguish right from wron... (more...)
The earliest and most common test for criminal insanity, in which a criminal defendant is judged legally insane only if he could not distinguish right from wrong at the time he committed the crime. For example, a delusional psychotic who believed that his assaultive acts were in response to the will of God would not be criminally responsible for his acts.

INFORMED CONSENT

An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available al... (more...)
An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available alternatives. For example, a patient may give informed consent to medical treatment only after the healthcare professional has disclosed all possible risks involved in accepting or rejecting the treatment. A healthcare provider or facility may be held responsible for an injury caused by an undisclosed risk. In another context, a person accused of committing a crime cannot give up his constitutional rights--for example, to remain silent or to talk with an attorney--unless and until he has been informed of those rights, usually via the well-known Miranda warnings.