Topeka Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Kansas


Kirk  Stange Lawyer

Kirk Stange

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Juvenile Law
Kirk Stange is a Founding Partner of Stange Law Firm, PC.

Stange Law Firm, PC was founded in 2007 by attorneys and husband/wife duo, Kirk and Paola Stange. The firm only practices family law and has multiple ... (more)

Steven R. Wiechman Lawyer

Steven R. Wiechman

VERIFIED
Bankruptcy & Debt, Family Law, Business

The quality of your legal counsel can greatly influence the outcome of your case, whether you are filing for bankruptcy or divorce, or facing a small-... (more)

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800-969-3921

John C. Johnson

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Bankruptcy Litigation, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Karan M. Thadani

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Children's Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT
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Joni C. Thadani

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Sarah Catherine Snyder

Divorce & Family Law, Paternity, Adoption, Divorce & Family Law, Defamation & Slander
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  9 Years

James R. Mcentire

Administrative Law, Divorce, Wills & Probate, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Patrick R. Barnes

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  39 Years

Eric K. Johnson

Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  43 Years

James Bradley Biggs

Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Real Estate, Workers' Compensation
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

ALIMONY

The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of lo... (more...)
The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of long duration (ten years or more) or in the case of an ailing spouse, alimony usually lasts for a set period, with the expectation that the recipient spouse will become self-supporting. Alimony is also called 'spousal support' or 'maintenance.'

CLOSE CORPORATION

A corporation owned and operated by a few individuals, often members of the same family, rather than by public shareholders. State laws permit close corporation... (more...)
A corporation owned and operated by a few individuals, often members of the same family, rather than by public shareholders. State laws permit close corporations to function more informally than regular corporations. For example, shareholders can make decisions without holding meetings of the board of directors, and can fill vacancies on the board without a vote of the shareholders.

BEST INTERESTS (OF THE CHILD)

The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best inter... (more...)
The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best interests of the child. Similarly, when asked to decide on custody issues in a divorce case, the judge will base his or her decision on the child's best interests. And the same test is used when judges decide whether a child should be removed from a parent's home because of neglect or abuse. Factors considered by the court in deciding the best interests of a child include: age and sex of the child mental and physical health of the child mental and physical health of the parents lifestyle and other social factors of the parents emotional ties between the parents and the child ability of the parents to provide the child with food, shelter, clothing and medical care established living pattern for the child concerning school, home, community and religious institution quality of schooling, and the child's preference.

SEPARATE PROPERTY

In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's... (more...)
In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's property division laws, but is kept by the spouse who owns it. Separate property includes all property that a spouse obtained before marriage, through inheritance or as a gift. It also includes any property that is traceable to separate property -- for example, cash from the sale of a vintage car owned by one spouse before marriage-and any property that the spouses agree is separate property. Compare community property and equitable distribution.

LEGAL RISK PLACEMENT

A type of adoption used by agencies to keep a child out of foster care during the adoption process. The child is placed with the adopting parents before the bir... (more...)
A type of adoption used by agencies to keep a child out of foster care during the adoption process. The child is placed with the adopting parents before the birthmother has legally given up her rights to raise the child. If she then decides not to relinquish her rights, the adopting parents must give the child back. This is a risk for the adopting parents, who may lose a child to whom they've become attached.

DEPENDENTS BENEFITS

A type of Social Security benefit available to spouses and minor or disabled children of retired or disabled workers who qualify for either retirement or disabi... (more...)
A type of Social Security benefit available to spouses and minor or disabled children of retired or disabled workers who qualify for either retirement or disability benefits under the program's rigorous qualification guidelines.

MARITAL PROPERTY

Most of the property accumulated by spouses during a marriage, called community property in some states. States differ as to exactly what is included in marital... (more...)
Most of the property accumulated by spouses during a marriage, called community property in some states. States differ as to exactly what is included in marital property; some states include all property and earnings dring the marriage, while others exclude gifts and inheritances.

COMPARABLE RECTITUDE

A doctrine that grants the spouse least at fault a divorce when both spouses have shown grounds for divorce. It is a response to an old common-law rule that pre... (more...)
A doctrine that grants the spouse least at fault a divorce when both spouses have shown grounds for divorce. It is a response to an old common-law rule that prevented a divorce when both spouses were at fault.

ARREARAGES

Overdue alimony or child support payments. In recent years, state laws have made it difficult to impossible to get rid of arrearages; they can't be discharged i... (more...)
Overdue alimony or child support payments. In recent years, state laws have made it difficult to impossible to get rid of arrearages; they can't be discharged in bankruptcy, and courts usually will not retroactively cancel them. A spouse or parent who falls on tough times and is unable to make payments should request a temporary modification of the payments before the arrearages build up.

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