Washington Trusts Lawyer, District of Columbia

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Kerri M Castellini Lawyer

Kerri M Castellini

Trusts, Power of Attorney, Wills & Probate, Elder Law, Estate

Kerri Castellini is a lawyer in of Washington D.C. who focuses on trusts and estates. She has also tried cases involving guardianship, power of atto... (more)

Steve  Larson-Jackson Lawyer

Steve Larson-Jackson

VERIFIED
Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills, Business

Steve Larson-Jackson is an Estate Lawyer proudly serving Washington, DC and the neighboring communities.

Benny L. Kass

Land Use & Zoning, Wills, Trusts, Banking & Finance
Status:  In Good Standing           

Mark M. Mitek

Wills, Wills & Probate, Trusts, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Nathan Thomas

Non-profit, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

Sean Arron Radin

Real Estate, Entertainment, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  14 Years

Alan Lee

Construction, Trusts, State Government, Wills
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  12 Years

Alexandra Dianne Harwin

Family Law, Trusts, Gift Taxation
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  8 Years

Amy Beth Wolfsheimer

Real Estate, Trusts, Estate Planning, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  7 Years

Andrew Thomas Richardson

Litigation, Trusts, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

ADEMPTION

The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she di... (more...)
The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she dies. Often this happens because the property has been sold, destroyed or given away to someone other than the beneficiary named in the will. A bequest may also be adeemed when the will maker, while still living, gives the property to the intended beneficiary (called 'ademption by satisfaction'). When a bequest is adeemed, the beneficiary named in the will is out of luck; he or she doesn't get cash or a different item of property to replace the one that was described in the will. For example, Mark writes in his will, 'I leave to Rob the family vehicle,' but then trades in his car in for a jet ski. When Mark dies, Rob will receive nothing. Frustrated beneficiaries may challenge an ademption in court, especially if the property was not clearly identified in the first place.

TRUST CORPUS

Latin for 'the body' of the trust. This term refers to all the property transferred to a trust. For example, if a trust is established (funded) with $250,000, t... (more...)
Latin for 'the body' of the trust. This term refers to all the property transferred to a trust. For example, if a trust is established (funded) with $250,000, that money is the corpus. Sometimes the trust corpus is known as the 'res,' a Latin word meaning 'thing.'

FAMILY POT TRUST

See pot trust.

AUGMENTED ESTATE

In general terms, an augmented estate consists of property owned by both a deceased person and his or her spouse. The concept of the augmented estate is used on... (more...)
In general terms, an augmented estate consists of property owned by both a deceased person and his or her spouse. The concept of the augmented estate is used only in some states. Its value is calculated only if a surviving spouse declines whatever he or she was left by will and instead claims a share of the deceased spouse's estate. (This is called taking against the will.) The amount of this 'statutory share' or 'elective share' depends on state law.

LETTERS TESTAMENTARY

The document given to an executor by the probate court, authorizing the executor to settle the estate according to either a will or the state's intestate succes... (more...)
The document given to an executor by the probate court, authorizing the executor to settle the estate according to either a will or the state's intestate succession laws.

TRUST DEED

The most common method of financing real estate purchases in California (most other states use mortgages). The trust deed transfers the title to the property to... (more...)
The most common method of financing real estate purchases in California (most other states use mortgages). The trust deed transfers the title to the property to a trustee -- often a title company -- who holds it as security for a loan. When the loan is paid off, the title is transferred to the borrower. The trustee will not become involved in the arrangement unless the borrower defaults on the loan. At that point, the trustee can sell the property and pay the lender from the proceeds.

FUNDING A TRUST

Transferring ownership of property to a trust.

INHERIT

To receive property from someone who has died. Traditionally, the word 'inherit' applied only when one received property from a relative who died without a will... (more...)
To receive property from someone who has died. Traditionally, the word 'inherit' applied only when one received property from a relative who died without a will. Currently, however, the word is used whenever someone receives property from the estate of a deceased person.

SPECIFIC BEQUEST

A specific item of property that is left to a named beneficiary under a will. If the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he dies, the bequ... (more...)
A specific item of property that is left to a named beneficiary under a will. If the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he dies, the bequest fails. In other words, the beneficiary cannot substitute a similar item in the estate. Example: If John leaves his 1954 Mercedes to Patti, and when John dies the 1954 Mercedes is long gone, Patti doesn't receive John's current car or the cash equivalent of the Mercedes. See ademption.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Ackerman v. Abbott

... On May 24, 2002, subsequent to Margaret's death, Genevieve and her husband Steven Ackerman executed two separate trusts: the Genevieve Ackerman Family Trust ("GAFT") and the Steven Ackerman Family Trust ("SAFT"). ...

LASCHÉ v. Levin

... Lasché I, 977 A.2d at 364, 369. These one-time distributions in the amounts of $159,601 and $56,815 were made respectively from inter vivos trusts of appellant's father and mother upon termination at each of their deaths. Id. at 369 & 369 n. 10. ...

Lasche v. Levin

... trust. The trial judge included Lasché's two distributions from his parents' trusts in his determination of Lasché's child support payments. The ... Supp.). Moreover, provisions of trusts dealing with payouts can vary considerably. A ...