Washita Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Oklahoma


Dustin Lane Compton Lawyer

Dustin Lane Compton

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Business, Litigation

What makes Dustin and his firm different is the deep emotional connection he builds with each client and the time he takes to get to know their trials... (more)

Fletcher D Handley Lawyer

Fletcher D Handley

VERIFIED
Criminal, Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Oil & Gas

Fletcher Dal Handley, Jr., is a civil justice attorney with The Handley Law Center in Oklahoma. His practice is focused on Personal Injury Law, repres... (more)

Dustin Lane Compton Lawyer

Dustin Lane Compton

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Business, Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute

What makes Dustin and his firm different is the deep emotional connection he builds with each client and the time he takes to get to know their trials... (more)

Phillip P. Owens Lawyer

Phillip P. Owens

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Lawsuit & Dispute

For more than two decades, Phillip P. Owens II has been fighting on behalf of individuals and families in Oklahoma City, Tulsa and throughout the stat... (more)

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Stephen R. McCalla

Elder Law, Estate Planning, Family Law, Mental Health
Status:  In Good Standing           

Larry Ray Monard

Insurance, Workers' Compensation, Social Security, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jason Eugene Glidewell

Adoption, Indians & Native Populations
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kimberly Rennie

Criminal, Employment, Business, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

David Keith Ratcliff

Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Traffic, Estate, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Amanda Renee Mullins

Foreclosure, Adoption, International, Immigration
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

ACCOMPANYING RELATIVE

An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card ca... (more...)
An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card can also obtain green cards or similar visas for accompanying relatives. Accompanying relatives include spouses and unmarried children under the age of 21.

COMPLAINT

Papers filed with a court clerk by the plaintiff to initiate a lawsuit by setting out facts and legal claims (usually called causes of action). In some states a... (more...)
Papers filed with a court clerk by the plaintiff to initiate a lawsuit by setting out facts and legal claims (usually called causes of action). In some states and in some types of legal actions, such as divorce, complaints are called petitions and the person filing is called the petitioner. To complete the initial stage of a lawsuit, the plaintiff's complaint must be served on the defendant, who then has the opportunity to respond by filing an answer. In practice, few lawyers prepare complaints from scratch. Instead they use -- and sometimes modify -- pre-drafted complaints widely available in form books.

SEPARATION

A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though... (more...)
A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though they may continue their relationship. A legal separation results when the parties separate and a court rules on the division of property, such as alimony or child support -- but does not grant a divorce.

GIFT TAXES

Federal taxes assessed on any gift, or combination of gifts, from one person to another that exceeds $12,000 in one year. Several kinds of gifts are exempt form... (more...)
Federal taxes assessed on any gift, or combination of gifts, from one person to another that exceeds $12,000 in one year. Several kinds of gifts are exempt form this tax: gifts to tax-exempt charities, gifts to your spouse (limited to $120,000 annually if the recipient isn't a U.S. citizen) and gifts made for tuition or medical bills. In addition to the annual gift tax exclusion, there is a $1 million cumulative tax exemption for gifts. In other words, you can give away a total of $1 million during your lifetime -- over and above the gifts you give using the annual exclusion -- without paying gift taxes.

PATERNITY SUIT

A lawsuit to determine the identity of the father of a child born outside of marriage, and to provide for the support of the child once the identity of the fath... (more...)
A lawsuit to determine the identity of the father of a child born outside of marriage, and to provide for the support of the child once the identity of the father has been determined.

CHILD

(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born o... (more...)
(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born outside of marriage. (2) A person under an age specified by law, often 14 or 16. For example, state law may require a person to be over the age of 14 to make a valid will, or may define the crime of statutory rape as sex with a person under the age of 16. In this sense, a child can be distinguished from a minor, who is a person under the age of 18 in most states. A person below the specified legal age who is married is often considered an adult rather than a child. See also emancipation.

INTERLOCUTORY DECREE

A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. ... (more...)
A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. In the past, interlocutory decrees were most often used in divorces. The terms of the divorce were set out in an interlocutory decree, which would become final only after a waiting period. The purpose of the waiting period was to allow the couple time to reconcile. They rarely did, however, so most states no longer use interlocutory decrees of divorce.

VISITATION RIGHTS

The right to see a child regularly, typically awarded by the court to the parent who does not have physical custody of the child. The court will deny visitation... (more...)
The right to see a child regularly, typically awarded by the court to the parent who does not have physical custody of the child. The court will deny visitation rights only if it decides that visitation would hurt the child so much that the parent should be kept away.

POT TRUST

A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One impor... (more...)
A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One important advantage of a pot trust over separate trusts is that it allows the trustee to provide for one child's unforeseen need, such as a medical emergency. But a pot trust can also make the trustee's life difficult by requiring choices about disbursing funds to the various children. A pot trust ends when the youngest child reaches a certain age, usually 18 or 21.