Weare Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, New Hampshire


Stephen R. Goldman

Trusts, Family Law, Corporate, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jonathan Cohen

Nursing Home, Divorce, White Collar Crime, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Douglas Charles III

Traffic, Medical Malpractice, Family Law, Workers' Compensation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Carolyn S. Garvey

Divorce, Child Support, Child Custody, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Stephen A. Duggan

Workers' Compensation, DUI-DWI, Divorce, Medical Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           

John P. Lebrun

Civil Rights, Collection, Family Law, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           

Melissa Penson

Contract, Personal Injury, Civil Rights, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

James J. Bianco

Health Care Other, Legislative Practice, Estate Planning, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           

Suzanne M. Gorman

Criminal, Family Law, Litigation
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  33 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

INTERLOCUTORY DECREE

A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. ... (more...)
A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. In the past, interlocutory decrees were most often used in divorces. The terms of the divorce were set out in an interlocutory decree, which would become final only after a waiting period. The purpose of the waiting period was to allow the couple time to reconcile. They rarely did, however, so most states no longer use interlocutory decrees of divorce.

PETITIONER

A person who initiates a lawsuit. A synonym for plaintiff, used almost universally in some states and in others for certain types of lawsuits, most commonly div... (more...)
A person who initiates a lawsuit. A synonym for plaintiff, used almost universally in some states and in others for certain types of lawsuits, most commonly divorce and other family law cases.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.

DISSOLUTION

A term used instead of divorce in some states.

SEPARATE PROPERTY

In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's... (more...)
In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's property division laws, but is kept by the spouse who owns it. Separate property includes all property that a spouse obtained before marriage, through inheritance or as a gift. It also includes any property that is traceable to separate property -- for example, cash from the sale of a vintage car owned by one spouse before marriage-and any property that the spouses agree is separate property. Compare community property and equitable distribution.

CONSOLIDATED OMNIBUS BUDGET RECONCILIATION ACT (COBRA)

A federal law requiring that employers offer employees -- and their spouses and dependents -- continuing insurance coverage if their work hours are cut or they ... (more...)
A federal law requiring that employers offer employees -- and their spouses and dependents -- continuing insurance coverage if their work hours are cut or they lose their job for any reason other than gross misconduct. Courts are still in the process of determining the meaning of gross misconduct, but it's clearly more serious than poor performance or judgment. COBRA also makes an ex-spouse and children eligible to receive group rate health insurance provided by the other ex-spouse's employer for three years following a divorce.

QMSCO

See Qualified Medical Child Support Order.

MARITAL TERMINATION AGREEMENT

See divorce agreement.

SHARED CUSTODY

See joint custody.

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