West Hartford Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Connecticut

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John  Heffernan Lawyer

John Heffernan

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Estate, Wills & Probate, Real Estate

After graduating from Fairfield University, John served two tours of duty in Viet Nam as an officer in a Naval Air A-4 Attack Squadron. Upon returning... (more)

Linda K. Bertolette Lawyer

Linda K. Bertolette

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Workers' Compensation, Estate, Real Estate

Attorney Bertolette has over 25 years of practice experience in family law, personal injury, workers’ compensation claims, real estate transactions,... (more)

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CONTACT

860-233-2300

Henry B. Hurvitz Lawyer

Henry B. Hurvitz

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Estate
Providing Seasoned Successful Supportive Legal Care.

At the Law Office of Henry B. Hurvitz, we are proud to offer the highest quality legal services at reasonable and affordable rates. Attorney Hurvitz ... (more)

John Michael Kelly Lawyer

John Michael Kelly

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Employment, Estate

John Kelly proudly serves Newington, CT and the neighboring communities in the areas of Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family, Employment, Estate, Gener... (more)

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Meghan  Freed Lawyer

Meghan Freed

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law

Meghan was in Glamour Magazine. (For a graduation speech.) She’s also frequently called to comment on legal issues in Connecticut publications a... (more)

Nicholas  Kocian Lawyer

Nicholas Kocian

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Workers' Compensation, Criminal

Nicholas Kocian is a practicing lawyer in the state of Connecticut.

Steven Ira Melocowsky Lawyer

Steven Ira Melocowsky

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Personal Injury, Criminal
Let Our Family Fight for Your Family

Steven I. Melocowsky is a founder of Melocowsky and Melocowsky. He provides legal commentary for local television stations such as FOX Ct News and WFS... (more)

Daniel B. Ryan Lawyer

Daniel B. Ryan

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Elder Law, Medicare & Medicaid

Attorney Ryan is a graduate of Holy Cross College (1963) and the University of Connecticut School of Law (1969). Since being admitted to the bar in 19... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-951-5850

Elizabeth  Rohback Lawyer

Elizabeth Rohback

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor, Felony

Elizabeth Rohback is a practicing lawyer in the state of Connecticut. Attorney Rohback received her J.D. from Brooklyn Law School in 2010.

Bruce W. Diamond Lawyer

Bruce W. Diamond

VERIFIED
Family Law, Divorce, Personal Injury, Car Accident, DUI-DWI
Taking great care of our clients for over 30 years.

Attorney Bruce W. Diamond received his B.A. in government from St. Lawrence University in 1982, and graduated from UCONN School of Law in 1985. He was... (more)

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CONTACT

800-931-8520

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find West Hartford Divorce & Family Law Lawyers and West Hartford Divorce & Family Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Divorce & Family Law practice areas such as Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce and Family Law matters.

LEGAL TERMS

ATTORNEY FEES

The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (... (more...)
The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (the lawyer collects a percentage of any money she wins for her client and nothing if there is no recovery), or retainer (usually a down payment as part of an hourly or per job fee agreement). Attorney fees must usually be paid by the client who hires a lawyer, though occasionally a law or contract will require the losing party of a lawsuit to pay the winner's court costs and attorney fees. For example, a contract might contain a provision that says the loser of any lawsuit between the parties to the contract will pay the winner's attorney fees. Many laws designed to protect consumers also provide for attorney fees -- for example, most state laws that require landlords to provide habitable housing also specify that a tenant who sues and wins using that law may collect attorney fees. And in family law cases -- divorce, custody and child support -- judges often have the power to order the more affluent spouse to pay the other spouse's attorney fees, even where there is no clear victor.

IN CAMERA

Latin for 'in chambers.' A legal proceeding is 'in camera' when a hearing is held before the judge in her private chambers or when the public is excluded from t... (more...)
Latin for 'in chambers.' A legal proceeding is 'in camera' when a hearing is held before the judge in her private chambers or when the public is excluded from the courtroom. Proceedings are often held in camera to protect victims and witnesses from public exposure, especially if the victim or witness is a child. There is still, however, a record made of the proceeding, typically by a court stenographer. The judge may decide to seal this record if the material is extremely sensitive or likely to prejudice one side or the other.

NEXT OF KIN

The closest relatives, as defined by state law, of a deceased person. Most states recognize the spouse and the nearest blood relatives as next of kin.

FAULT DIVORCE

A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorc... (more...)
A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorce from the 'guilty' spouse. Today, 35 states still allow a spouse to allege fault in obtaining a divorce. The traditional fault grounds for divorce are adultery, cruelty, desertion, confinement in prison, physical incapacity and incurable insanity. These grounds are also generally referred to as marital misconduct.

AGE OF MAJORITY

Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in ... (more...)
Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in the armed forces and purchase alcohol. Also, parents may stop making child support payments when a child reaches the age of majority. In most states the age of majority is 18, but this varies depending on the activity. For example, in some states people are allowed to vote when they reach the age of eighteen, but can't purchase alcohol until they're 21.

INCURABLE INSANITY

A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of... (more...)
A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of the spouse being divorced and that the insanity is incurable.

LEGAL CUSTODY

The right and obligation to make decisions about a child's upbringing, including schooling and medical care. Many states typically have both parents share legal... (more...)
The right and obligation to make decisions about a child's upbringing, including schooling and medical care. Many states typically have both parents share legal custody of a child. Compare physical custody.

POT TRUST

A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One impor... (more...)
A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One important advantage of a pot trust over separate trusts is that it allows the trustee to provide for one child's unforeseen need, such as a medical emergency. But a pot trust can also make the trustee's life difficult by requiring choices about disbursing funds to the various children. A pot trust ends when the youngest child reaches a certain age, usually 18 or 21.

COMMUNITY PROPERTY

A method for defining the ownership of property acquired during marriage, in which all earnings during marriage and all property acquired with those earnings ar... (more...)
A method for defining the ownership of property acquired during marriage, in which all earnings during marriage and all property acquired with those earnings are considered community property and all debts incurred during marriage are community property debts. Community property laws exist in Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin. Compare equitable distribution and separate property.