Worcester Family Law Lawyer, Massachusetts

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Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Frederick C. Rushton Lawyer

Frederick C. Rushton

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Family Law, Divorce, Personal Injury, Immigration, Criminal
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Since 1994, Attorney Frederick C. Rushton has provided comprehensive legal counsel and representation in matters of Personal Injury, Family Law, Crimi... (more)

Heather A O'Connor Lawyer

Heather A O'Connor

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Divorce & Family Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Family Law, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Custody
Don't Settle For Less Than Exceptional

Heather O’Connor has been described as one of the nicest people you will ever meet, until you are an opposing party in the courtroom; she then puts ... (more)

David J. Kneeland

Real Estate, Personal Injury, Workers' Compensation, Family Law
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Jennifer Melia

Farms, Family Law, Child Support, Divorce & Family Law
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Elaine F. Gordon

Child Support, Children's Rights, Collaborative Law, Farms
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Chris LoConto

Criminal, Divorce, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Family Law
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Polly A Tatum

Adoption, Farms, Divorce, Family Law
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John Francis Madaio

Child Support, Criminal, Divorce, Family Law
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Family Law, Corporate, Business Organization, Estate Planning
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LEGAL TERMS

RESTRAINING ORDER

An order from a court directing one person not to do something, such as make contact with another person, enter the family home or remove a child from the state... (more...)
An order from a court directing one person not to do something, such as make contact with another person, enter the family home or remove a child from the state. Restraining orders are typically issued in cases in which spousal abuse or stalking is feared -- or has occurred -- in an attempt to ensure the victim's safety. Restraining orders are also commonly issued to cool down ugly disputes between neighbors.

QUALIFIED MEDICAL CHILD SUPPORT ORDER (QMSCO)

A court order that provides health benefit coverage for the child of the noncustodial parent under that parent's group health plan.

FOSTER CARE

Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents h... (more...)
Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents have a legal responsibility to care for their foster children, but do not have all the rights of a biological parent--for example, they may have limited rights to discipline the children, to raise them according to a certain religion or to authorize non-emergency medical procedures for them. The foster parents do not become the child's legal parents unless the biological parents' rights are terminated by a court and the foster parents adopt the child. This is not typically encouraged, as the goal of foster care is to provide temporary support for the children until they can be returned to their parents. See also foster child.

ARREARAGES

Overdue alimony or child support payments. In recent years, state laws have made it difficult to impossible to get rid of arrearages; they can't be discharged i... (more...)
Overdue alimony or child support payments. In recent years, state laws have made it difficult to impossible to get rid of arrearages; they can't be discharged in bankruptcy, and courts usually will not retroactively cancel them. A spouse or parent who falls on tough times and is unable to make payments should request a temporary modification of the payments before the arrearages build up.

SOLE CUSTODY

An arrangement whereby only one parent has physical and legal custody of a child and the other parent has visitation rights.

UNCONTESTED DIVORCE

A divorce automatically granted by a court when the spouse who is served with a summons and complaint for divorce fails to file a formal response with the court... (more...)
A divorce automatically granted by a court when the spouse who is served with a summons and complaint for divorce fails to file a formal response with the court. Many divorces proceed this way when the spouses have worked everything out and there's no reason for both to go to court -- and pay the court costs.

ANNULMENT

A court procedure that dissolves a marriage and treats it as if it never happened. Annulments are rare since the advent of no-fault divorce but may be obtained ... (more...)
A court procedure that dissolves a marriage and treats it as if it never happened. Annulments are rare since the advent of no-fault divorce but may be obtained in most states for one of the following reasons: misrepresentation, concealment (for example, of an addiction or criminal record), misunderstanding and refusal to consummate the marriage.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.

INCOMPATIBILITY

A conflict in personalities that makes married life together impossible. In a number of states, incompatibility is the accepted reason for a no-fault divorce. C... (more...)
A conflict in personalities that makes married life together impossible. In a number of states, incompatibility is the accepted reason for a no-fault divorce. Compare irreconcilable differences; irremediable breakdown.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Vorontsova v. Waronzov

... See generally Kindregan & Inker, Family Law and Practice § 28:4 (3d ed. 2002). "Under that doctrine, Massachusetts generally will recognize and enforce valid judgments rendered by a foreign court" (emphasis supplied). ... See generally Katz, Family Law in America 82 (2003). ...

Ansin v. Craven-Ansin

... See CP Kindregan, Jr., & ML Inker, Family Law and Practice § 50:15 (3d ed. 2002) (hereinafter Kindregan & Inker) (agreement made in expectation of marriage "radically" different situation from 290 "that which faces a spouse attempting to save a long existing family relationship ...

Eyster v. Pechenik

... required. Kindregan & Inker, Family Law & Practice § 20:6, at 751 (3d ed. 2002) ("there is no mandate that each party consult an attorney since a competent person can represent himself, however unwise such a choice may be"). ...