Bloomington Family Law Lawyer, Illinois


Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

James Waller

Internet, Family Law, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Dustin Noel Koth

Traffic, Family Law, Divorce, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  8 Years

Alice Faye Smalley

Estate, Family Law, Divorce, Transactions
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  33 Years

James Henry Waller

DUI-DWI, Divorce, Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Wendy Christine Maulson

Traffic, Family Law, Divorce & Family Law, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  29 Years

John Schwulst

Estate Planning, Family Law, Divorce, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  51 Years

Michelle Mosby

Estate Planning, Family Law, Divorce, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  27 Years

Brenda Diane Temke

Juvenile Law, Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  35 Years

Michelle Renee Mosby

Estate Planning, Family Law, Divorce, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  27 Years

Chandra Lin Justice

Motor Vehicle, Family Law, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

CUSTODY (OF A CHILD)

The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When ... (more...)
The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When parents separate or divorce, one of the hardest decisions they have to make is which parent will have custody. The most common arrangement is for one parent to have custody (both physical and legal) while the other parent has a right of visitation. But it is not uncommon for the parents to share legal custody, even though one parent has physical custody. The most uncommon arrangement is for the parents to share both legal and physical custody.

NEXT OF KIN

The closest relatives, as defined by state law, of a deceased person. Most states recognize the spouse and the nearest blood relatives as next of kin.

FOSTER CHILD

A child placed by a government agency or a court in the care of someone other than his or her natural parents. Foster children may be removed from their family ... (more...)
A child placed by a government agency or a court in the care of someone other than his or her natural parents. Foster children may be removed from their family home because of parental abuse or neglect. Occasionally, parents voluntarily place their children in foster care. See foster care.

ADOPT

(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative bo... (more...)
(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative body may adopt a law or an amendment, a government agency may adopt a regulation or a party to a lawsuit may adopt a particular argument.

BEST INTERESTS (OF THE CHILD)

The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best inter... (more...)
The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best interests of the child. Similarly, when asked to decide on custody issues in a divorce case, the judge will base his or her decision on the child's best interests. And the same test is used when judges decide whether a child should be removed from a parent's home because of neglect or abuse. Factors considered by the court in deciding the best interests of a child include: age and sex of the child mental and physical health of the child mental and physical health of the parents lifestyle and other social factors of the parents emotional ties between the parents and the child ability of the parents to provide the child with food, shelter, clothing and medical care established living pattern for the child concerning school, home, community and religious institution quality of schooling, and the child's preference.

AGE OF MAJORITY

Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in ... (more...)
Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in the armed forces and purchase alcohol. Also, parents may stop making child support payments when a child reaches the age of majority. In most states the age of majority is 18, but this varies depending on the activity. For example, in some states people are allowed to vote when they reach the age of eighteen, but can't purchase alcohol until they're 21.

ATTORNEY FEES

The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (... (more...)
The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (the lawyer collects a percentage of any money she wins for her client and nothing if there is no recovery), or retainer (usually a down payment as part of an hourly or per job fee agreement). Attorney fees must usually be paid by the client who hires a lawyer, though occasionally a law or contract will require the losing party of a lawsuit to pay the winner's court costs and attorney fees. For example, a contract might contain a provision that says the loser of any lawsuit between the parties to the contract will pay the winner's attorney fees. Many laws designed to protect consumers also provide for attorney fees -- for example, most state laws that require landlords to provide habitable housing also specify that a tenant who sues and wins using that law may collect attorney fees. And in family law cases -- divorce, custody and child support -- judges often have the power to order the more affluent spouse to pay the other spouse's attorney fees, even where there is no clear victor.

LAWFUL ISSUE

Formerly, statutes governing wills used this phrase to specify children born to married parents, and to exclude those born out of wedlock. Now, the phrase means... (more...)
Formerly, statutes governing wills used this phrase to specify children born to married parents, and to exclude those born out of wedlock. Now, the phrase means the same as issue and 'lineal descendant.'

PATERNITY SUIT

A lawsuit to determine the identity of the father of a child born outside of marriage, and to provide for the support of the child once the identity of the fath... (more...)
A lawsuit to determine the identity of the father of a child born outside of marriage, and to provide for the support of the child once the identity of the father has been determined.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

ILLINOIS DEPT. OF HEALTHCARE v. Warner

... rights were terminated, (2) the children had been in the custody and guardianship of the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS ... The parent still has a residual, common law duty to support the child, and this residual duty stands as an exception to section 17 of ...

Blum v. Koster

... terminated for some reason, a separate award for child support would be agreed upon by the parties or determined by the court. [3] E. Mirabelli, Family Law Case Update, Law Update, ISBA Annual Meeting (June 27, 2008).

AMERICAN FAMILY MUT. v. NORTHERN HERITAGE

... Pursuant to section 2-615 (735 ILCS 5/2-615 (West 2008)), the motion argued that the third amended complaint was insufficient at law for the following reasons: 1) American Family failed to plead how and when it became the subrogee of McGrath's rights of action in violation of ...