Brunswick Wills & Probate Lawyer, Maine


Includes: Estate Administration, Living Wills, Wills

John Moncure

Business & Trade, Electronic Commerce, Commercial Real Estate, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Arthur J. Lamothe

Real Estate, Wills & Probate, Trusts, Corporate, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  34 Years

John A. Cunningham

Real Estate, Wills & Probate, Corporate, Contract
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  39 Years

Christopher E. Goodwin

Real Estate, Contract, Corporate, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  19 Years
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Martin L. Wilk

Real Estate, Wills & Probate, Corporate, Contract
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  53 Years

James Michael Mason

Other, Wills & Probate, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  17 Years

Suzanne L. Johnson

Wills & Probate, Trusts, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  Retired           Licensed:  34 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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800-943-8690

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By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

ACCUMULATION TRUST

A trust in which the income is retained and not paid out to beneficiaries until certain conditions are met. For example, if Uncle Pierre creates a trust for Nic... (more...)
A trust in which the income is retained and not paid out to beneficiaries until certain conditions are met. For example, if Uncle Pierre creates a trust for Nick's benefit but stipulates that Nick will not get a penny until he gets a Ph.D. in French; Nick is the beneficiary of an accumulation trust.

HEIR APPARENT

One who expects to be receive property from the estate of a family member, as long as she outlives that person.

SWEARING MATCH

A case that turns on the word of one witness versus another. The outcome of a swearing match usually depends on whom the jury finds most trustworthy.

TRUSTEE POWERS

The provisions in a trust document defining what the trustee may and may not do.

UNIFORM TRANSFER-ON-DEATH SECURITY ACT

A statute that allows people to name a beneficiary to inherit stocks or bonds without probate. The owner of the securities can register them with a broker using... (more...)
A statute that allows people to name a beneficiary to inherit stocks or bonds without probate. The owner of the securities can register them with a broker using a simple form that names a person to receive the property after the owner's death. Every state but Texas has adopted the statute.

ADEMPTION

The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she di... (more...)
The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she dies. Often this happens because the property has been sold, destroyed or given away to someone other than the beneficiary named in the will. A bequest may also be adeemed when the will maker, while still living, gives the property to the intended beneficiary (called 'ademption by satisfaction'). When a bequest is adeemed, the beneficiary named in the will is out of luck; he or she doesn't get cash or a different item of property to replace the one that was described in the will. For example, Mark writes in his will, 'I leave to Rob the family vehicle,' but then trades in his car in for a jet ski. When Mark dies, Rob will receive nothing. Frustrated beneficiaries may challenge an ademption in court, especially if the property was not clearly identified in the first place.

SECONDARY MEANING

In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use ... (more...)
In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use and exposure in the marketplace. For example, though first names are not generally considered inherently distinctive, Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream has become so well known that it is now entitled to maximum trademark protection.

SUMMARY PROBATE

A relatively simple probate proceeding available for 'small estates,' as that term is defined by state law. Every state's definition is different, and many are ... (more...)
A relatively simple probate proceeding available for 'small estates,' as that term is defined by state law. Every state's definition is different, and many are complicated, but a few examples include estates worth up to $100,000 in California; New York estates where property, excluding real estate and amounts that must be set aside for surviving family members, is worth $20,000 or less; and Texas estates where the value of property doesn't exceed what is needed to pay a family allowance and certain creditors.

SELF-PROVING WILL

A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-prov... (more...)
A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-proving when two witnesses sign under penalty of perjury that they observed the willmaker sign it and that he told them it was his will. If no one contests the validity of the will, the probate court will accept the will without hearing the testimony of the witnesses or other evidence. To make a self-proving will in other states, the willmaker and one or more witnesses must sign an affidavit (sworn statement) before a notary public certifying that the will is genuine and that all willmaking formalities have been observed.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

In re Estate of Kingsbury

... Dissent: SAUFLEY, CJ, and ALEXANDER, and SILVER, JJ. CLIFFORD, J. [¶ 1] The estate of Bruce H. Kingsbury, through its personal representative, Robin L. Whorff, appeals from an order entered in the Sagadahoc County Probate Court (Voorhees, J.) (1) providing that Whorff ...

IN RE ESTATE OF LIPIN

... PER CURIAM. [¶ 1] Joan Carol Lipin challenges the denial of her request for recusal entered in the Cumberland County Probate Court (Mazziotti, J.) in connection with the probate of the estate of her father, Theodore Lipin. We ...

Edwards v. Campbell

... Campbell has appealed. II. DISCUSSION. [¶ 6] Campbell first contends that the court lacked subject matter jurisdiction to issue the contempt order as to the trust accounting, arguing instead that the Probate Court has exclusive jurisdiction over such matters. ...