Northampton Estate Lawyer, England


Susan Owens

Trusts, Wills
Status:  In Good Standing           

Sharon Lorraine Eyre

Trusts, Tax, Wills
Status:  In Good Standing           

Stephanie Blanche Howe

Family Law, Tax, Wills
Status:  In Good Standing           

Peter Grant Wilton

Wills, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  19 Years

Peter James Critchell

Power of Attorney, Trusts, Estate, Wills
Status:  In Good Standing           

Tanya Isabel Simpson

Wills, Family Law, Power of Attorney
Status:  In Good Standing           

Helen Margaret Wingfield

Wills, Estate Administration
Status:  In Good Standing           

Sean Robert Nicholas Patrick Burke

Real Estate, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

Suzanne Barbara Evans

Wills, Estate Planning, International Tax
Status:  In Good Standing           

Andrew Peter Sutton

Business, Real Estate, Wills & Probate, Power of Attorney
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

RESIDUARY ESTATE

The property that remains in a deceased person's estate after all specific gifts are made, and all debts, taxes, administrative fees, probate costs, and court c... (more...)
The property that remains in a deceased person's estate after all specific gifts are made, and all debts, taxes, administrative fees, probate costs, and court costs are paid. The residuary estate also includes any gifts under a will that fail or lapse. For example, Connie's will leaves her house and all its furnishings to Andrew, her VW bug to her friend Carl, and the remainder of her property (the residuary estate) to her sister Sara. She doesn't name any alternate beneficiaries. Carl dies before Connie. The VW bug becomes part of the residuary estate and passes to Sara, along with all of Connie's property other than the house and furnishings. Also called the residual estate or residue.

CREDIT SHELTER TRUST

See AB trust.

HEIR APPARENT

One who expects to be receive property from the estate of a family member, as long as she outlives that person.

CERTIFIED COPY

A copy of a document issued by a court or government agency guaranteed to be a true and exact copy of the original. Many agencies and institutions require certi... (more...)
A copy of a document issued by a court or government agency guaranteed to be a true and exact copy of the original. Many agencies and institutions require certified copies of legal documents before permitting certain transactions. For example, a certified copy of a death certificate is required before a bank will release the funds in a deceased person's payable-on-death account to the person who has inherited them.

POUR-OVER WILL

A will that 'pours over' property into a trust when the will maker dies. Property left through the will must go through probate before it goes into the trust.

SELF-PROVING WILL

A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-prov... (more...)
A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-proving when two witnesses sign under penalty of perjury that they observed the willmaker sign it and that he told them it was his will. If no one contests the validity of the will, the probate court will accept the will without hearing the testimony of the witnesses or other evidence. To make a self-proving will in other states, the willmaker and one or more witnesses must sign an affidavit (sworn statement) before a notary public certifying that the will is genuine and that all willmaking formalities have been observed.

EXEMPTION TRUST

A bypass trust funded with an amount no larger than the personal federal estate tax exemption in the year of death. If the trust grantor leaves property worth m... (more...)
A bypass trust funded with an amount no larger than the personal federal estate tax exemption in the year of death. If the trust grantor leaves property worth more than that amount, it usually goes to the surviving spouse. The trust property passes free from estate tax because of the personal exemption, and the rest is shielded from tax under the surviving spouse's marital deduction.

IRREVOCABLE TRUST

A permanent trust. Once you create it, it cannot be revoked, amended or changed in any way.

CURATOR

See conservator.