Stoke-on-Trent Criminal Lawyer, England


Nicola Jayne Bell

Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

Lee James Yates

Accident & Injury, Criminal, Traffic
Status:  In Good Standing           

Gareth John Wilkinson

Criminal, Dispute Resolution, Sports
Status:  In Good Standing           

David James

Licensing, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Andrea Theresa Bruce

Merger & Acquisition, Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA), DUI-DWI, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

Helene Maillet Vioud

Merger & Acquisition, Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA), DUI-DWI, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

Hamish Grant Noble

Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Michael John Kimberley

Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Shaun William Kellett

Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Peter John Howland

Estate, Criminal, Corporate, Securities Fraud
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

FELONY

A serious crime (contrasted with misdemeanors and infractions, less serious crimes), usually punishable by a prison term of more than one year or, in some cases... (more...)
A serious crime (contrasted with misdemeanors and infractions, less serious crimes), usually punishable by a prison term of more than one year or, in some cases, by death. For example, murder, extortion and kidnapping are felonies; a minor fist fight is usually charged as a misdemeanor, and a speeding ticket is generally an infraction.

SENTENCE

Punishment in a criminal case. A sentence can range from a fine and community service to life imprisonment or death. For most crimes, the sentence is chosen by ... (more...)
Punishment in a criminal case. A sentence can range from a fine and community service to life imprisonment or death. For most crimes, the sentence is chosen by the trial judge; the jury chooses the sentence only in a capital case, when it must choose between life in prison without parole and death.

GRAND JURY

In criminal cases, a group that decides whether there is enough evidence to justify an indictment (formal charges) and a trial. A grand jury indictment is the f... (more...)
In criminal cases, a group that decides whether there is enough evidence to justify an indictment (formal charges) and a trial. A grand jury indictment is the first step, after arrest, in any formal prosecution of a felony.

CONVICTION

A finding by a judge or jury that the defendant is guilty of a crime.

CRIMINAL CASE

A lawsuit brought by a prosecutor employed by the federal, state or local government that charges a person with the commission of a crime.

IMPRISON

To put a person in prison or jail or otherwise confine him as punishment for committing a crime.

PLEA BARGAIN

A negotiation between the defense and prosecution (and sometimes the judge) that settles a criminal case. The defendant typically pleads guilty to a lesser crim... (more...)
A negotiation between the defense and prosecution (and sometimes the judge) that settles a criminal case. The defendant typically pleads guilty to a lesser crime (or fewer charges) than originally charged, in exchange for a guaranteed sentence that is shorter than what the defendant could face if convicted at trial. The prosecution gets the certainty of a conviction and a known sentence; the defendant avoids the risk of a higher sentence; and the judge gets to move on to other cases.

MCNAGHTEN RULE

The earliest and most common test for criminal insanity, in which a criminal defendant is judged legally insane only if he could not distinguish right from wron... (more...)
The earliest and most common test for criminal insanity, in which a criminal defendant is judged legally insane only if he could not distinguish right from wrong at the time he committed the crime. For example, a delusional psychotic who believed that his assaultive acts were in response to the will of God would not be criminally responsible for his acts.

EXCLUSIONARY RULE

A rule of evidence that disallows the use of illegally obtained evidence in criminal trials. For example, the exclusionary rule would prevent a prosecutor from ... (more...)
A rule of evidence that disallows the use of illegally obtained evidence in criminal trials. For example, the exclusionary rule would prevent a prosecutor from introducing at trial evidence seized during an illegal search.